Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Archive for May 2011

HAND MOTORICS – Hands, Hypermobility & a Hand Motor Quiz!

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Hands are by far the most differentiated multi-functional tools of the body. Women usually have more talent for tasks that require the use of fine hand motor skills (involving the fingers). While men have more talent for tasks that require more forcefull & spatial hand motor skills (where the arm becomes involved). But sometimes these ‘hand talents’ are featured with a serious handicap!

The hand motorics of individuals can vary significantly, and the individual difference can manifest skills that relate to e.g. flexibility, mobility, strength, handedness, sensation & hand gestures. But this is common knowledge for quite a while

HANDS & HYPERMOBILITY:

An example of how a ‘hand talent’ can be featured with a servious handicap concerns having hyperflexible hands, which is also known as ‘double jointed thumbs’ or ‘hypermobile fingers’.

People who have this hand characteristic are often able to ‘show’ their talent by making funny gestures such as seen in the picture above. However, hypermobility in the hands may also be symptomatic of a serious medical condition, such as: the hand in Down’s syndrome, the hand in fragile-X syndrome,  the hand in Marfan syndrome & the hand in rheumatoid arthritis.

And in those cases Multi-Perspective Palm Reading will become helpfull to discriminate by other hand characteristics – such as e.g. hand shape – which problem is involved. A classic source for learning more about how the hand relates to human behavior & diseases is Dr. Theodore J. Berry‘s  work The Hand as a mirror of Systemic Disease (1963)

A SIMPLE HAND MOTOR QUIZ!

Below are the hand in 4 disorders displayed, including (listed by alphabetic order):

1 – Marfan syndrome;
2 – Down syndrome; 
3 – rheumatoid arthritis. 

Can you recognize in the picture below which of these three disorders belongs to the hands A, B and C…???

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Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 19, 2011 at 12:17 am

SCARY HANDS (2) – Three hand skin conditions that indicate serious health troubles!

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After describing in the last post a few hand conditions (eczema & granuloma anulare) that may look scary but are relatively harmless, in this new post we focuss on a fex examples of hand skin conditions that typically indicate serious health problems.

The following 3 hand conditions were e.g. presented in a Medscape slideshow, and they can usually be described as ‘worrisome’:

 

LICHEN PLANUS:

Lichen Planus (see photo above) manifest typically as a rash made up of reddish-purple, flat-topped bumps that may itch like crazy. It usually appears on the wrists (or on the ankles of the feet, but may be on the lower back, neck, legs, and genitals). The cause of Lichen Planus isn’t known — but if you have it, you’ll need to get liver tests. It could be a sign of hepatitis C.

 

TRIPE PALMS:

Tripe Palms (see photo above) describes a skin condition in which the skin of the palm becomes thick and velvety-white with pronounced folds in the lines of the hand. The skin resembles boiled tripe. It’s a sign of cancer. If only the palms are involved, it’s most likely lung cancer. If tripe palms is accompanied by acanthosis nigricans, it’s most likely gastric cancer.


NEPHROGENIC SYSTEMIC FIBROSIS / WOODEN HANDS:

Nephrogenic System Fibrosis (see photo above) was first described in 1997. Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis starts ussually as a brown discoloration and indentation of the lower arms and legs. Very soon, the hands and feet become brown and like wood. NOTICE: Sometimes there’s also a small yellow spot in the eye. Researchers only recently found that the gadolinium contrast agent used during MRI exams triggers this condition in some patients with kidney failure.

 

Read more about the role of skin quality conditions in Multiple-Perspective Palm Reading:

http://www.multiperspectivepalmreading.com/palm-reading-hand-skin-quality.htm

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 17, 2011 at 12:30 am

SCARY HANDS (1) – Eczema hand conditions can be annoying, but usually these are harmless!

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Many hand skin conditions do not indicate that anything else is wrong with you. Hand eczema can happen to anyone typically manifests as dry hands.  Dry hands that persist despite the use of lotions and creams may be a sign of a condition called hand eczema or dermatitis. However, hand eczema may sometimes be difficult or impossible to differentiate from more worrisome hand conditions, such as: atopic dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, and psoriasis, which also commonly involve the hands.  And even a biopsy for all these conditions may not result in a definitive diagnosis.

Below follows an overview of ‘scary’ hand conditions that are usually harmless.


HAND ECZEMA:

Hand eczema is a term used for different types of hand skin inflammation (dermatitis). The symptoms of eczema typically include itchy, reddened, dry skin. Many things can cause this type of skin irritation such as dryness, soaps and detergents, cleaning products, rubber gloves and even cosmetic lotions and creams. Since the skin is itchy, prolonged scratching often occurs which in turn leads to reddened, irritated, scaling skin or to a leathery thickening of the skin (sometimes called lichenification). Cracking and weeping of the skin may also occur and open sores may become infected. And there are basically two types of dermatitis: ‘contact dermatitis’ and ‘atopic dermatitis’. The causes of eczema have not been fully determined, but allergies, stress, irritants, and genetic factors are all associated as possible causes for the development of this hand condition (see the photo below).


GRANULOMA ANNULARE:

Granuloma annulare is a chronic skin disease consisting of a rash with reddish bumps arranged in a circle or ring. Granuloma annulare is different from warts. A cryotherapy treatment typically will not produce permanent results. And this skin condition most often affects children, young and older adults and it is also slightly more common in females. This hand skin condition is usually seen in otherwise healthy people – though sometime it is associated with diabetes, thyroid diseases, or auto-immune diseases.

But there are other hand skin conditions that can be relatively harmless, such as: red skin, blisters, microinfarcts, little spots & vasculitis.

More info about these conditions & their role in ‘Multi-Perspective Palm Reading’ is available here:

http://www.multiperspectivepalmreading.com/palm-reading-hand-skin-quality.htm

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 15, 2011 at 1:34 am

The Skin of Your Hands provides another Window to Your (future) Health!

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Your skin can be a window to your underlying health, says Joseph Jorizzo, MD, one of the experts who wrote the book ‘Dermatological Signs of Internal Disease‘. Many underlying health conditions — some very serious — first appear as skin problems.

In an earlier post you were able to read how your fingernails can be used as a barometer for your (past) health – during the past sixe months. As a matter of fact, medical science classifies the fingernails as a part of your outer skin systems which surrounds your body. So it should not be surprizing that your skin can provide clues about your health as well. 

But first of all: not all skin conditions are scary!  Many skin conditions do not indicate that anything else is wrong with you. For example, granuloma annulare is raised, reddish or flesh-colored bumps forming ring patterns on the hands and feet. They usually go away within two years, and don’t mean anything is wrong with you.

The difference betwen ‘harmless’ hand skin conditions & ‘worrisome’ hand skin conditions will be discussed in the next series of posts.

Read more about the role of skin conditions in Multiple-Perspective Palm Reading:

Palm Reading & Skin Quality

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 14, 2011 at 1:57 am

DERMATOGLYPHICS – A World Map based on Fingerprints!

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A world map based on the pattern-index of fingerprints around the world.

The science of fingerprint interpretation has still a long road ahead before it’s value will be recognized everywhere around the world. Most people are only aware of the fact that each single fingerprint has it’s own unique characteristics – which makes every fingerprint unique in any person. However, beyond the aspect of personal identification, there is another spectrum hidden in the characteristics of the finger glyphs: a perspective that relates to the qualities of your chromosomes & genes… and your health!

The unique characteristics of your fingerprints were already established before you were born. But while it is relatively easy to recognize/describe the uniqueness of a single fingerprint, it is much harder to ‘read’ other info from a fingerprint.


THE ART OF COMBINATION:

Using fingerprint for diagnostic matters requires an understanding of how to discriminate common fingerprint characteristics from rare- or even ‘suspected’ characteristics – in a diagnostic context.

Medical science learns us that unusual dermatoglyphic patterns (usually a combination of fingerprints & palmar dermatoglyphs) often relate to genetic disorders. But is it possible to make a reliable diagnosis from the fingerprints only?


SEXE DIFFERENCES:

Studies around the world nearly always indicate that fingerprints show typical variations among males and females: whorls are more common in the hands of males, arches are more common in the hands of females. And regarding loops: radial loops are usually slightly more common in males, and ulnar loops in females.


ETHNIC DIFFERENCES:

Fingerprint studies around the world have also confirmed that fingerprints also vary with the location in the world. Asians are known for having more whorls, North-Europeans are known for having more loops, and certain tribes in Central Africa are known for having more arches.


FINGER VARIATIONS:

But there is another specific characteristic that has hardly ever been described thoroughly. Because the major fingerprint types typically manifest in different ratios among the fingers.

A few examples:

• ULNAR LOOPS are in all world populations (males & females) seen in the large majority on the pinky finger. And a likewise pattern is seen for the middle finger.

WHORLS are usually the most dominant type on the thumb, index finger & ring finger; but the prevalance of whorls is typically only slightly higher than the prevalance of ulnar loops.

RADIAL LOOPS are typically only seen on the index finger (though these are also not uncommon on the middle finger).

ARCHES are most often seen on the index finger, but they are also not uncommon for the middle finger & thumb.


THE UNIVERSAL PATTERN:

Fingerprint studies have indicated that in nearly all regions of the world the loop is found to be the most common fingerprint type. And therefore the distributions for the arches & whorls become decisive.

A detailed study including the fingerprints of over 12.000 people from 12 countries around the world has revealed that fingerprints typically manifest following the so-called ‘universal pattern’: which describes that ulnar loops typically dominate the pinky & middle finger, and whorls typically dominate the thumb, index finger and ring finger – see the picture below.

Read more about how in Multi-Perspective Palm Reading fingerprints relate to e.g. autism, diabetes mellitus, Down’s syndrome, fragile-X syndrome & schizophrenia:
http://www.multiperspectivepalmreading.com/palm-reading-dermatoglyphics-fingerprints.htm


Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 13, 2011 at 2:53 am

PALMAR LINES & HAND DIAGNOSTICS – An introduction!

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The palmar lines

Despite the fact that the hand lines (creases) have been on the scientific anvil during the past centrury, most people still associate these mysterious wrinkles with gypsies & the stigma of fortune-telling.

 
While the biological function of the hand lines is not understood well, various branches of academic science have adopted the hand lines as a scientific tool for exploring the genetic- & biological differences between various populations around the world… and the causes of disease!
 

ANTHROPOLOGY:
 
Many people assume that hand lines are only relevant to the ‘superstitious’ palmist. However, the truth is that antropologists have studied the anatomical aspects of the palmar- & plantar creases in both human- and primate populations. Paul Broca (1877) was the first to stir up interest among anthropologists in the so-called ‘simian crease’ by introducing the ethnic element in the study of creases. And even in 2nd decade of the 21th century few people appear to be aware of the racial differences in the perspective of the hand lines.
 

MEDICAL SCIENCE:
 
The medical significance of the hand lines became appearant after Langdon-Down (1909) described the significance of the ‘simian crease’ for Down syndrome. But his observation was valued with scepsis for quite a while, until the genetic cause of Down syndrome (trisomy 21) was recognized after the discovery of the Karyotype techniques in the 1950.
 
 

Later other hand line variations – such as the ‘Sydney line’ and the ‘hockey-stick crease’ – became as well associated with other syndromes, diseases & behavior characteristics – including criminal behavior, autism, schizophrenia, etc.
 

BOOKS:

The following book is solely devoted to the scientific study of the hand lines, including the consideration of various elements that can be described as ‘building stones’ in Mult-Perspective Palm Reading):

Anthropology of Crease Morphogenesis (1991), author: R.S. Bali


Bali writes in the final chapter ‘Creases – Their Scope and Goals’ (page 361):

“… Pronouncements on the association of creases with character and temperament are bound to remain questionable. But future researches on crease features, such as crease surface area, crease splits, crease length, and crease borders, may perhaps throw some light on the relationship. The crease surface area, in term of centimetre counts, cell counts and ridge counts, makes a sufficiently sensitive scale for marking change under differential, physiological, psychological or social stresses. This interesting area of investigation remains to be explored by future researchers.”

 
 

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 10, 2011 at 10:03 pm

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: discussions at the Modern Hand Reading Forum!

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Discussions about Multi-Perspective Palm Reading are available at the Modern Hand Reading Forum, see forum section IIIb:

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading – discussions


Beyond Multi-Perspective Palm Reading various other types of hand reading are being discussed at the Modern Hand Reading Forum, including: Psychodiagnostic Chirology, Elemental Chirology, Life Purpose Hand Analysis & Vedic Palmistry.

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 9, 2011 at 11:00 pm

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