Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Archive for the ‘fingerprints’ Category

Discover the fundamentals of DMIT – The Dermatoglyphics Multiple Intelligences Test!

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Concept of the Dermatoglyphics Multiple Intelligences Test!

The ‘Dermatoglyphics Multiple Intelligences Test’, also known as DMIT, can be described as an appealing commercial product which suggests that ‘Multiple Intelligences’ can be assessed from dermatoglyphics & fingerprints. During the past years DMIT became a popular niche in some Asian countries with the use of smart marketing techniques focussed on especially young parents, who are often insecure about their child’s future.

Is DMIT really the reliable & valide test that it claims to represent?

This brand new article helps you to discover the fundamentals of DMIT + the work of the people behind this clever marketing palm reading product; however, you can also read about  how DMIT got banned in some regions around the world:

Dermatoglyphics Multiple Intelligences Test (DMIT): a fundamental review!


Enjoy the reading, and please do feel free to share your thoughts in response!!!

Radial loop fingerprints provide a clue for Down syndrome!

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Multi-Perspective Palm Reading demonstrates how fingerprint types can become a significant tool in finding diseases and other genetically determined characteristics in an individual. This article demonstrates how radial loop fingerprints can be used for recognizing Down syndrome (trisomy 21).

Even though radial loop fingerprints are less commonly see in people who have Down syndrome (radial loops are more commonly seen in the general population), the rather a-typical distribution of radial loops across the fingers of Down syndrome patients provides a very significant clue!

This is due to the fact that radial loops usually tend to manifest on the index finger and/or middle finger. In the gneral population almost 80% of radial loop fingerprints tend to be found on the index finger (2nd finger).

However, in Down syndrome radial loops tend to manifest on the ringer finger of pinky (about 75% of radial loops in Down syndrome are spotted on these fingers) – see the picture at the top of this article.

NOTICE: Despite these facts one should always be aware that a single radial loop in isolation from the rest of the hand is a meaningless marker. Even in perfectly healthy intelligent people one can sometimes find a radial loop on the ring finger or pinky. This implicates that a consideration of other perspectives of the hand (especially hand shape & finger length morphology) is always required in order to associate a radial loop fingerprint in an individual with Down syndrom!

Sources:

http://www.handresearch.com/news/10-facts-about-radial-loop-fingerprints.htm
http://www.multiperspectivepalmreading.com/hands-down-syndrome-palm-reading.htm

 

The picture below describes some other typical hand markers in Down syndrome (fingerprints can only provide a clue).

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

August 13, 2013 at 12:40 am

Primatology palm reading!

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Primatology palm reading demonstrates how hand structure + function relate to capabilities & behavior. The ‘Primate Hands Family Tree’ (see picture above) describes the typical hand characteristics seen in the major primate subfamilies and the individual species.

For example, the so-called ‘prosimians’ (lower primates) have a completely different hand structure than seen in the so-called ‘simians’ (higher primates – including human kind).  Because in ‘prosimians’ the 4th digit is typically the longest of all 5 digits, while in ‘simians’ the 3rd digit is typically the longest.

But there is so much more to tell about the hand structure in primates. For example, there is a clear pattern in the male-female hand difference (males tend to have relatively longer fingers + wider palms than females), and the typical hand features seen in gorillas & baboons – who are both known as the most violent primate species!

And interestingly… the Primate Hands Family Tree also gives us a better understanding of the nature of the 2D:4D digit ratio (far most primates species have a much lower ratio than seen in human kind) and the fascinating dermatoglyphic ‘whorl’ patterns (in nearly all primate species ‘whorls’  are more common than in us humans).

The article ‘Primate Palm Reading‘ includes a summary of many interesting facts about the evolutionary basis of modern palm reading – including 20+ fascinating illustrations!

FULL ARTICLE:

http://www.handresearch.com/news/primatology-palm-reading-primate-hands-family-tree.htm

 

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

March 27, 2013 at 1:22 am

Hand Assessment Chart: A palm reading profile via 36 hand features!

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Aristole described: ‘the hand is the organ of the organs’. Later, in medical science the hand became recognized to represent the most differentiated external part of the body. This implicates that an assessment of the hand is a rather complex (arbitrary) task. In order to simplify the task an ‘assessment chart’ was developed based on the principles described by Multi-Perspective Palm Reading.

The ‘assessment chart’ (see above) presents an overview of 36 key-features of the hand, the significance of all individual hand markers involved has been confirmed in scientific studies – though the significance of course varies and depends on the theme for which a hand feature is used to make a (hand) assessment.

The chart is divided in 8 sections, one for each of the 7 hand dimensions (including: dermatoglyphics, finger length, lines, motorics, nails, shape & skin) – NOTICE: the dimension ‘dermatoglyphics’ is divided in a sub-section describing the fingerprints + a sub-section describing palmar dermatoglyphics.

Learn more about the background, purpose & principles of Multi-Perspective Palm Reading!

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

February 9, 2013 at 1:02 am

The TOP 10 Hand Signs in Diabetes Mellitus – type 1!

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Sclerodactly: thickening of the dorsal skin a very significant hand sign for the hand in Diabetes Mellitus – type 1.

 

– THE TOP 10 HAND SIGNS FOR RECOGNIZING DIABETES MELLITUS – TYPE 1 –

This TOP 10 is composed from a list of 34 hand signs for Diabetes Mellitus; the hand signs are ranked by Log Odds Ratio – which are calculated from the prevalence (%) among Diabetics & controls.

1 – Sclerodactyly: thick, waxy/hardening skin on back of the hand [Log Odds Ratio = +4.58]
2 – Fingerprints: radial loop on pinky [Log Odds Ratio = +3.16]
3 – Fingerprints: radial loop on ringfinger [Log Odds Ratio = +3.09]
4 – Neuropathy: loss of function: movement / sensation (Tinel’s sign, Phalen’s test, preacher sign / prayer sign, limited joint mobility) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.98]
5 – Pink patches on back of the hand / fingers (granuloma annulare lesions) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.73]
6 – Shiny patches, first: red-brown & painless, later: yellow & ulceration (necrobiosis lipoidica) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.71]
7 – Little skin pebbles on back of the hand / fingers (Huntley’s papules) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.64]
8 – Locked finger, a.k.a. ‘trigger finger’ (stenosing tenosynovitis) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.50]
9 – Palm ridges: high density on hypothenar [Log Odds Ratio = +2.50]
10 – Palm: radial arch on hypothenar [Log Odds Ratio = + 2.47]

‘Scerodactly’ (= localized thickening of the skin on the fingers: see the photo above & below) is listed as the most significant hand sign in diabetes mellitus type 1 (= insuline dependent diabetes) – according the log odds ratio statistics. And it is interesting to notice here that 4 of the 10 hand signs relate to the skin of the hand (see hand signs 1, 5, 6 and 7), including one that relates to the nails (hand sign 4).

NOTICE: In the field of medical dermatology the nails are perceived as being a part of the skin!

Additionally, studies have shown that skin abnormalties in diabetes become very signficant when these are also featured by motoric problems.

And it is fascinating to notice that these TOP 10 hand signs significant for Diabetes Mellitus – type 1 is a mix of hand features that relate to both the palm (5 hand signs) and fingers (7 hand signs) – hand sign five and seven relates to both the palm and the fingers.

And these 10 hand signs also relate to five of the seven perspectives described by Multi-Perspective Palm Reading, including: the skin quality of the hand (4 hand signs), fingerprints & palmar dermatoglyphics (4 hand signs), hand motorics (2 hand signs).

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

August 23, 2011 at 6:36 pm

TOP 10 Hand Signs indicative for Fragile-X syndrome!

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A pair of hands of a female person who has Fragile-X syndrome.

 

– THE TOP 10 HAND SIGNS FOR RECOGNIZING FRAGILE-X SYNDROME –

This TOP 10 is composed from a list of 34 hand signs for Fragile-X syndrome, and the hand signs are ranked by Log Odds Ratio – which are calculated from the prevalence (%) among people who have Fragile-X syndrome & controls.

1 – Sydney line [Log Odds Ratio = +3.63]
2 – Ridge line A: ends btw. finger 5 & heart line [Log Odds Ratio = + 3.44]
3 – Triradius b: missing (or ridge line B is ‘abortive’) [Log Odds Ratio = +3.32]
4 – Fingerprints: radial loop on thumb [Log Odds Ratio = +3.28]
5 – Ridge line C: ‘abortive’ [end close to triradius c] [Log Odds Ratio = +3.22]
6 – Simian crease [Log Odds Ratio = +3.08]
7 – Double-jointed thumbs (hypermobility) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.73]
8 – Fingerprints: arch on ring finger [Log Odds Ratio = +2.24]
9 – Fingerprints: arch on pinky finger (in males only) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.14]
10 – Palmar triradius d: missing [Log Odds Ratio = +2.10]


It is interesting to notice here that 7 of the 10 hand signs relate to the upper half of the hand (the zone below the finger + the fingerprints), and additionally the major palmar lines (head line & heart line often manifest as a simian crease or Sydney line) play a significant role.

And it is fascinating to notice that these TOP 10 hand signs significant for Fragile-X syndrome is a mix of hand features that relate to both the palm (7 hand signs) and fingers (3 hand signs).

And these 10 hand signs also relate to five of the seven perspectives described by Multi-Perspective Palm Reading, including: the dermatoglyphics (7 hand signs), major palmar lines (2 hand signs), and hand motorics (1 hand sign).


NOTICE: At a later moment a likewise TOP 10 will be presented for hand signs that are indicative for autism – about 3% of people who have autism also have fragile-X syndrome!

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 19, 2011 at 12:59 pm

The Embryology behind Hand Clues for Congenital Heart defects!

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 In the last post a few hand markers were described which signal the presence of congenital heart defects. How come that hands present clues about congenital heart defects?

The answer is relatively simple: the basic structure of both the hands & the heart is developed in the same period of the prenatal development. Below follows an overview of landmark developments in the heart and the hands from week 4 to week 8 after conception.


WEEK 4 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: A pipe-shaped heart is formed and begins to beat.

– HANDS: – (the hands are not yet formed)

 

 

WEEK 5 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: A dividing wall is formed in the heart (heartbeat continues in one chamber).

– HANDS: The hands are shaped like paddles.

 


 WEEK 6 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: The heart has devided into right and left chambers.

– HANDS: Finger soon take shape.

 

 


 WEEK 7 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: The main structure of the heart is now complete.

– HANDS: Fingers are forming, but are still joined by webs of skin; the ‘volar pads’ become manifest which preceed the formation of the fingerprints – notice: the shape of the ‘volar pads’ correlates with the fingerprint type that is later formed.

 


 WEEK 8 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: Continues growing.

– HANDS: As the hands develop they have lost their paddle like look. The touch pads of the fingers form and already have fingerprints.


More details are available in the article:

The embryology & the morphogenesis of the hand lines 

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 4, 2011 at 2:22 am

Fingerprints reveal Clues about Congenital Heart Defects!

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 In an earlier post a report was made that fingerprints reveal clues about many things – including: sexe, race, diet, lifestyle and disease. Fingerprint ridge width & the so-called ‘minituae’ provide info about sexe.

In this new report we’ll focuss on a few details in the fingerprint of the pinky finger.

 


Pinky fingers are usually featured with an ulnar loop:

The World Map of Fingerprints has shown that in all nations around the world the pinky fingerprint is dominated by the presence of an ‘ulnar loop’.

And in a study among 5 world populations (N=2.785) in 78% of the individuals the pinky finger is featured with an ‘ulnar loop’. The study also revealed that the effect size for fingerprints & sexe and fingerprints & ethnic difference is the largest in the pinky finger.

Other studies (Loesch, 1983) have revealed that when a pinky finger is featured with a whorl or arch, the ring finger is usually featured with the same fingerprint pattern type. In other words: the fingerprint type on the pinky finger typically highly depends on the fingerprints of the other fingers – especially the ring finger.

This implicates that the fingerprint type displayed by the little finger hardly provides any clues – because usually it’s an ‘ulnar loop’ and otherwise it correlates with the fingerprint on the ring finger.


Ridge count in pinky fingers:

However, beyond the fingerprint pattern type, another aspect of the fingerprint may reveal more specified meaningful information.

The earlier report explained how fingerprint ridge density & minituae (dermatoglyphics) correlate with sexe – especially when applied to the pinky finger.

 But there is another revealing aspects: the so-called ‘ridge count’.

For example: in 1989 a study revealed that the ridge count in the left pinky finger can become highly meaningful when it is summarized with the ridge count of the five finger of the right hand minus the ridge count of the five fingers of the left hand. In a population of people with congenital heart defects in Down syndrome, the summation outcome was typically (in 10 out of 13 individuals) lower than the ridge count of the left pinky finger itself. While among the control population (people who have Down syndrome without congenital heart defects) the same result was relatively rare (in only 1 out of 38 individuals).

One can understand this rather remarkable example of palm reading in the perspective of the fact that usually in the fingers of the right hand the ridge count is typically higher than in the fingers of the left hand (this effect is often largest in the thumb).


 Read more about how these results & dermatoglyphics can be understand in the perspective of hand developments & life in the uterus:

http://www.handresearch.com/news/fingerprint-characteristic-early-prenatal-environment.htm

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 3, 2011 at 4:19 am

Dr. Erina Lee Describes How to Use Hands in Building Relationships!

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As a research scientist, Dr. Lee is responsible for the international relationships research at eHarmony. In the following article she described how the hands can become involved in building relationships.

Whether they’re soft and manicured, strong and calloused, weathered and wrinkled—hands come in all shapes and sizes and can often say a lot about you. They can reveal the tattered fingernails of nervous nail biter, the orange fingers of a cheese puff lover, or the worn hands of a grandmother. And when you look even closer at the many lines and wrinkles, is it possible that your hands can reveal even more? Some people believe that clues to our basic selves can be found in the details of our hands. But do our hands really tell us anything of importance about who we really are? Is it possible that the numerous bumps and ridges unique to every hand hold some insight into our level of intelligence or into our love lives?

In an eternal quest for self-discovery, people have looked towards palm readers, among other mystics, to see if the lines in their hands really tell them something meaningful about themselves and their future. In current times, people turn to internet quizzes and online palm reading to make sense of the heart and life lines and the shape of their hands. Although these tests and quizzes can be fun, when put to the test of empirical science, most of these claims and predictions cannot be verified. Furthermore, these uncorroborated predictions about personality traits and future events leave palmistry in the category of a pseudoscience.

 Despite the inaccuracy of palm readings, however, there are aspects of the hands that have been studied empirically, including finger length. When looking at the palm of your hand, fingers straight together, you will likely notice a difference between your second (index) and fourth (ring) fingers. On average women have longer index fingers, compared to ring fingers while men have longer ring fingers compared to index fingers. This association between the two fingers, called the 2D:4D ratio, is related to levels of androgen exposure (a sex hormone higher in men) in the womb. That means that the amount of male hormones a fetus is exposed to determines this very specific detail of finger length in the hands. The precise mechanism by which androgen works is not entirely clear, but in general most theorists believe that increasing androgen exposure will masculinize a fetus. There is also some evidence suggesting that either too much or too little androgen can be feminizing to the fetus.

Because androgen exposure is related to sexual development and masculinization, researchers have begun to wonder if the 2D:4D ratio, as a marker of hormone exposure, may also predict other characteristics. Hormone exposure has been linked to things like general physical health, cognitive abilities, personality, job preferences, attractiveness, and sexual orientation. While the 2D:4D ratio may relate to these developmental characteristics, thus far the evidence supporting such a link is at best described as mixed. For example, there has been much attention dedicated to whether the 2D:4D ratio relates to sexual orientation. While there have been several studies in this area, some have shown no differences between heterosexual and homosexual men in their 2D:4D ratios (e.g., Williams et al., 2000), and others, like Lippa, have shown heterosexual men having lower 2D:4D ratios compared to homosexual men. Similarly with other characteristics like personality and attraction, the research findings have been fairly inconsistent.

 Another aspect of the hands that have been conclusively studied are the ridges, the ones that cover the palms and fingers, the ones that make up our unique fingerprints. The study of these ridges is called dermatoglyphics. Similar to the finger length, these ridges are known to be established earlier in the embryonic development, while the fetus is still in the womb. Researchers have shown dermatoglyphic differences between non-deficient people and those with cognitive or genetic abnormalities, like schizophrenia, Down’s syndrome, and intellectual disability. For example, individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia show fewer ridges between two specific points under the second and third fingers [a-b ridge count] compared to non-schizophrenic controls (Bramon et al., 2005). These findings support the idea that changes in the prenatal environment can display its effects in multiple ways, including changes in cognitive development and ridges of the hands. However, the findings do not assume that all people with fewer ridges have cognitive deficiencies.

To summarize, we do know that specific details in our hands are affected by early hormonal exposure and other environmental influences in the womb. And we know that this early exposure also affects other aspects of our development. While it is intriguing to speculate further that details in our hands can predict aspects of our personality or behavior, these conjectures have not been empirically supported. It’s also likely that there are more direct measures of personality, intelligence, and behavioral traits rather than the hands. But even though you can’t currently rely on your hands to unlock all of your mysteries, one thing you can count on is more studies and discussion about them to come.

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 24, 2011 at 2:27 am

What can a single Fingerprint really reveal?

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Fingerprints mark us out as individuals and leave telltale signs of our presence on every object that we touch. However, what else can a fingerprints reveal? Authors of many palm reading books suggest that a single fingerprint represents certain ‘fixed’ qualities. However, there has never been presented any evidence which support such specific claim. And despite the fact that certain fingerprint characteristics correlate highly for sexe an individual, even the sexe can not always be determined from a single fingerprint!

What can a single fingerprint reveal? As a matter of fact, there are many myths about fingerprints. For quite a while scientists assumed that the purpose of fingerprints should be associated with giving ‘grip’ to the hand. But even this ‘grip’ theory became doubtful according a 2009 study.


CAN A SINGLE FINGERPRINT REVEAL IF IT BELONGS TO A MALE OR FEMALE?

The current state of knowledge is that only the distal region of a fingerprint correlates with sexe. Studies have revealed that fingerprint ridge densities of 12 or less (per 25 mm) is usually a male, while fingerprint ridge densities of 15 or more (per 25 mm) is usually a female. But fingerprint ridge density alone can not reliably predict the sexe in large samples (below 75%).

However, there is a long list of tiny fingerprint characteristics that are also significant for sexe; and combining ridge density with those characteristics will usually result in a correct identification of sexe – especially when applied to the pinky finger.


A summary of major
& minutiae ridge characteristics that vary among males & females:

1 – Finger size: larger in males;
2 – Ridge dots: more common in males (34%) than in females (20%);
3 – Short ridges: more common in males (38%) than in females (23%);
4 – Ridge spurs: more common in males (32%) than in females (26%);
5 – No ridge endings: more common in females (8% ) than in males (2%);
6 – Ridge lakes: more common in females (45%) than in males (35%);
7 Ridge thickness to valley thickness ratio (RTVTR): lower in females;
8 – Ridge count: lower in females.


READ MORE ABOUT FINGERPRINTS:

Fingerprint distributions & hand diagnostics
Fascinating articles & reports about fingerprints

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 22, 2011 at 1:44 am

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