Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Posts Tagged ‘diseases

PALMAR LINES & HAND DIAGNOSTICS – An introduction!

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The palmar lines

Despite the fact that the hand lines (creases) have been on the scientific anvil during the past centrury, most people still associate these mysterious wrinkles with gypsies & the stigma of fortune-telling.

 
While the biological function of the hand lines is not understood well, various branches of academic science have adopted the hand lines as a scientific tool for exploring the genetic- & biological differences between various populations around the world… and the causes of disease!
 

ANTHROPOLOGY:
 
Many people assume that hand lines are only relevant to the ‘superstitious’ palmist. However, the truth is that antropologists have studied the anatomical aspects of the palmar- & plantar creases in both human- and primate populations. Paul Broca (1877) was the first to stir up interest among anthropologists in the so-called ‘simian crease’ by introducing the ethnic element in the study of creases. And even in 2nd decade of the 21th century few people appear to be aware of the racial differences in the perspective of the hand lines.
 

MEDICAL SCIENCE:
 
The medical significance of the hand lines became appearant after Langdon-Down (1909) described the significance of the ‘simian crease’ for Down syndrome. But his observation was valued with scepsis for quite a while, until the genetic cause of Down syndrome (trisomy 21) was recognized after the discovery of the Karyotype techniques in the 1950.
 
 

Later other hand line variations – such as the ‘Sydney line’ and the ‘hockey-stick crease’ – became as well associated with other syndromes, diseases & behavior characteristics – including criminal behavior, autism, schizophrenia, etc.
 

BOOKS:

The following book is solely devoted to the scientific study of the hand lines, including the consideration of various elements that can be described as ‘building stones’ in Mult-Perspective Palm Reading):

Anthropology of Crease Morphogenesis (1991), author: R.S. Bali


Bali writes in the final chapter ‘Creases – Their Scope and Goals’ (page 361):

“… Pronouncements on the association of creases with character and temperament are bound to remain questionable. But future researches on crease features, such as crease surface area, crease splits, crease length, and crease borders, may perhaps throw some light on the relationship. The crease surface area, in term of centimetre counts, cell counts and ridge counts, makes a sufficiently sensitive scale for marking change under differential, physiological, psychological or social stresses. This interesting area of investigation remains to be explored by future researchers.”

 
 

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 10, 2011 at 10:03 pm

The philosophy of Multi-Perspective Palm Reading!

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What discriminates ‘Multi-Perspective Palm Reading’ from all other approaches in the field of hand reading? The unique characteristic of ‘Multi-Perspective Palm Reading’ is that it only includes hand markers which have been confirmed to have significant value according scientific studies.

In Multi-Perspective Palm Reading is the hand studied from 7 different perspectives in order to make an assessment for various specified themes – which can result in either a confirming- or prognostic ‘hand-diagnosis’. 


The philosophy behind Multi-Perspective Palm Reading:

The philosophy behind this new advanced type of hand reading can be described as follows:

“In Multi-Perspective Palm Reading, a reliable hand-diagnosis is only possible when a pair of hands displays ‘diagnostic clues’ in MULTIPLE perspectives of the hand. According Multi-Perspective Palm Reading a person typically requires to have ‘diagnostic clues’ in at least 3 perspectives of his/her hands, before one can speak of a solid, specified hand-diagnosis.

The application of this philosophy in the practice for making a hand assessment can be understood by studying the role of the simian line in hand diagnostics. In the 20th century the simian line (the most well known of all palm line variations: a.k.a. the single palmar transverse crease or simain crease) became known as a diagnostic marker for Down syndrome. However, during the past decades this uncommon hand marker was recognized as a ‘minor physical anomaly’ that has diagnostic value for other syndromes, diseases & developmental problems. But in order to specify it’s significance as a major hand line for the individual that has this characteristic in one or both hands, a study of the other perspectives of the hand is required!


The 7 perspectives used in Multi-Perspective Palm Reading:

In the following seven perspectives are required to be studied in order to make a thorough hand assessment:

1 – Palm Reading & the HAND SHAPE, including: hand index, palm shape, hand length, hand breath;
2 – Palm Reading & the FINGERNAILS, including: color, morphology, structure, growth;
3 – Palm Reading & FINGER MORPHOLOGY, including: length, 2D:4D ratio, variations in shape;
4 – Palm Reading & the MAJOR LINES, including: primary crease, secundary creases, accessory creases;
5 – Palm Reading & the DERMATOGLYPHICS, including: fingerprints, palm dermatoglyphics;
6 – Palm Reading & SKIN QUALITY, including: colour, structure, tone;
7 – Palm Reading & HAND MOTORICS, including: flexibility, motoric hand index.

Read more about how Multi-Perspective Palm Reading varies from other types of hand reading & modern palmistry via the Wikipedia section: Modern Palmistry: science & criticism

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 1, 2011 at 11:55 pm

The History of Palm Reading – How the Indian Vedas relate to the latest Scientific Publications!

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 The earliest known written reference to palm reading in the World literature are found in two writings in the ancient Vedic literature of India: ‘The Laws of Manu’ and in the ‘Vasishtha Rules’ – which include a list of rules given to guide the ascetic in the correct way to lead the religious life. But what are the origins of the ‘idea’ of  palm reading: what is described about how it must have started?

First of all, while the world literature started around 3000 BC (written on clay tablets),  we have to be aware that the printed written literature on paper dates from about 400 years ago. 

Around that time an Indian Sanskrit text, titled: ‘Sariraka Shastra’, was published which includes Vedic stanzas that describe how ‘Hasta Samudrika Shastra’ (translated: ‘body knowledge of the hand’) has evolved in the early days of human kind. The text was translated by an Indian palmist (V.A.K Ayer) and published in 1960 under the title: “Sariraka Sastra – Indian Science of Hand Reading based on Kartikeyan System”. The book describes how long ago when Lord Vishnu was enjoying his ‘yoga nidra’ in the company of his consort Lakshmi, the sea-lord Samudra showed up and began to write down the auspicious marks on the bodies of the divine couple – for the guidance of humanity. This story explains how classic Indian Palmistry became an art of reading signs via the hand!

 

 The Laws of Manu:

“Manu was the legendary first man, the Adam of the Hindus.”

(Quoted from sacret-text.com)

Chapter X in “The Laws of Manu” describes as a guidance for the ascetic:

“21. ‘Neither by (explaining) prodigies and omens, nor by skill in astrology and palmistry, nor by casuistry and expositions (of the Sâstras), let him ever seek to obtain alms.'”

 

Inborn hand markers vs. Indian hand signs:

And in a way, the modern academic science of studying ‘minor physical anomalies’ is basically not really very different from how the Indians used palmistry to speculate about their future.

While the ancient Indians studied body signs to know the future of individuals (with a speculative philosophic purpose of course), is modern science basically interested in studying body signs to understand the etiology of diseases and disorders. And while the Indians formulated theories about ‘dynamic’ signs (which may change or even disappear in time), is modern science more focussed on inborn body markers.

So, while Indian palmists typically focuss on tiny little marks of the hand (lines, spots, moles, etc) – are modern hand researchers much more interested in relatively stable hand markers such as: the fingerprints, palmar dermatoglypics, simian crease and the so-called ‘digit ratio’ (= the finger length ratio between the index finger and the ring finger).

The new Palmistry?

Over the past few years quite a few academic researchers have published interesting studies which suggest that the hand can be used as prognostic marker for certain common diseases.

And the new Multi-Perspective Palm Reading represents a direct result of the many (tousands) studies that have been perfpormed so far on 100+ hand markers – read more about these developments via: What is Multi-Perspective Palm Reading?

But typically, these studies have been welcomed with a considerable dosis of scepticism. A few of recent examples of these reviews are presented below:

• April 2011: The New Palmistry?

• July 2010: Digit ratio: A measure of two hormonally-based temperament dimensions

• June 2010: Reading the Body – Finger Length Ratio predicts Athletic Ability!

• April 2009: Palmistry’s Digital Analgue?

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

April 30, 2011 at 2:11 am

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