Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Posts Tagged ‘fingerprints

TOP 10 Hand Signs indicative for Fragile-X syndrome!

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A pair of hands of a female person who has Fragile-X syndrome.

 

– THE TOP 10 HAND SIGNS FOR RECOGNIZING FRAGILE-X SYNDROME –

This TOP 10 is composed from a list of 34 hand signs for Fragile-X syndrome, and the hand signs are ranked by Log Odds Ratio – which are calculated from the prevalence (%) among people who have Fragile-X syndrome & controls.

1 – Sydney line [Log Odds Ratio = +3.63]
2 – Ridge line A: ends btw. finger 5 & heart line [Log Odds Ratio = + 3.44]
3 – Triradius b: missing (or ridge line B is ‘abortive’) [Log Odds Ratio = +3.32]
4 – Fingerprints: radial loop on thumb [Log Odds Ratio = +3.28]
5 – Ridge line C: ‘abortive’ [end close to triradius c] [Log Odds Ratio = +3.22]
6 – Simian crease [Log Odds Ratio = +3.08]
7 – Double-jointed thumbs (hypermobility) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.73]
8 – Fingerprints: arch on ring finger [Log Odds Ratio = +2.24]
9 – Fingerprints: arch on pinky finger (in males only) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.14]
10 – Palmar triradius d: missing [Log Odds Ratio = +2.10]


It is interesting to notice here that 7 of the 10 hand signs relate to the upper half of the hand (the zone below the finger + the fingerprints), and additionally the major palmar lines (head line & heart line often manifest as a simian crease or Sydney line) play a significant role.

And it is fascinating to notice that these TOP 10 hand signs significant for Fragile-X syndrome is a mix of hand features that relate to both the palm (7 hand signs) and fingers (3 hand signs).

And these 10 hand signs also relate to five of the seven perspectives described by Multi-Perspective Palm Reading, including: the dermatoglyphics (7 hand signs), major palmar lines (2 hand signs), and hand motorics (1 hand sign).


NOTICE: At a later moment a likewise TOP 10 will be presented for hand signs that are indicative for autism – about 3% of people who have autism also have fragile-X syndrome!

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Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 19, 2011 at 12:59 pm

40 Common hand characteristics: how many do you have?

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40 Common hand characteristics

How to recognize common hand characteristics from uncommon hand characteristics?

The picture above provides a point of reference: it describes 40 typical hand characteristics that can be described as ‘common’: 20 characteristics for the right hand + 20 characteristics for the left hand.

As a matter of fact, there are quite a few other common hand characteristic. However, the combination presented in the picture above illustrates which hand features (e.g. fingerprint types) are found most commonly in which zone of the hand. As you can seen: there are significant differences between the right- and left hand!

The 40 hand characteristics (32 dermatoglyphic + 8 line features ) include :

 • 10 Fingerprints (5 in each hand): on each finger your can find one of the four basis types of fingerprints (whorl, ulnar loop, radial loop or arch);

10 Palmar deltas – a.k.a. ‘triradii’ (5 in each hand) : one below each of the 8 fingers + the so-called ‘axial triradius’, which is usually found in the zone near the wrist on the hypothenar (mount of moon);

10 Central palmar ridge lines (5 in each hand): starting in the palmar deltas these ridge lines always first progress towards the center of the palm, but they typically exit the palm at specific locations (for example: the ridge line starting in the delta below the pinky finger exits the palm in the right hand typically between the index finger and the middle finger, however in the left hand the same ridge line tends to exit the palm between the middle finger and the ring finger);

2 Palmar loops (1 in each hand): in the right hand the palmar loop is typically found between the middle finger and the ring finger, but in the left hand the palmar loop is typically found between the ring finger and the pinky finger;

6 Major creases – a.k.a. primary hand lines (3 in each hand): which terminate independently somewhere inside the palm (= the life line, head line & heart line);

– 2 Line connections (1 in each hand): at the starting point of the life line and the head line are typically connected.


More details about these common hand characteristics are available here:

http://www.multiperspectivepalmreading.com/palm-reading-common-hand-characteristics.htm


Now… how many of these characteristics do you have?


NOTICE:
Though each of these 40 hand characteristics is quite common, nobody in the world has all these 40 characteristics!

Especially this specific combination of 10 fingerprints is actually extremely rare; because the combination seen in the left hand: one arch combined in the same hand with 2 whorls is extremely rare on itself!

 Combining this extremely rare with e.g. the radial loop + the other specific patterns on the right hand (which is seen in about 1% of all people) makes it quite unlikely that these 10 fingerprints will be observed in any person.

Finally, the anthropometric hand data presented in the picture are taken from e.g. the German BAuA, UK data from the ‘Handbook of normal physical measurements’ + 3 sources which represent large US populations. And these 40 hand characteristics together provide a new helpfull ‘point of reference’ in the perspective of Multi-Perspective Palm Reading. Especially regarding the study of hand characteristics in the so-called ‘phantom pictures’!

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 22, 2011 at 4:44 pm

The philosophy of Multi-Perspective Palm Reading!

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What discriminates ‘Multi-Perspective Palm Reading’ from all other approaches in the field of hand reading? The unique characteristic of ‘Multi-Perspective Palm Reading’ is that it only includes hand markers which have been confirmed to have significant value according scientific studies.

In Multi-Perspective Palm Reading is the hand studied from 7 different perspectives in order to make an assessment for various specified themes – which can result in either a confirming- or prognostic ‘hand-diagnosis’. 


The philosophy behind Multi-Perspective Palm Reading:

The philosophy behind this new advanced type of hand reading can be described as follows:

“In Multi-Perspective Palm Reading, a reliable hand-diagnosis is only possible when a pair of hands displays ‘diagnostic clues’ in MULTIPLE perspectives of the hand. According Multi-Perspective Palm Reading a person typically requires to have ‘diagnostic clues’ in at least 3 perspectives of his/her hands, before one can speak of a solid, specified hand-diagnosis.

The application of this philosophy in the practice for making a hand assessment can be understood by studying the role of the simian line in hand diagnostics. In the 20th century the simian line (the most well known of all palm line variations: a.k.a. the single palmar transverse crease or simain crease) became known as a diagnostic marker for Down syndrome. However, during the past decades this uncommon hand marker was recognized as a ‘minor physical anomaly’ that has diagnostic value for other syndromes, diseases & developmental problems. But in order to specify it’s significance as a major hand line for the individual that has this characteristic in one or both hands, a study of the other perspectives of the hand is required!


The 7 perspectives used in Multi-Perspective Palm Reading:

In the following seven perspectives are required to be studied in order to make a thorough hand assessment:

1 – Palm Reading & the HAND SHAPE, including: hand index, palm shape, hand length, hand breath;
2 – Palm Reading & the FINGERNAILS, including: color, morphology, structure, growth;
3 – Palm Reading & FINGER MORPHOLOGY, including: length, 2D:4D ratio, variations in shape;
4 – Palm Reading & the MAJOR LINES, including: primary crease, secundary creases, accessory creases;
5 – Palm Reading & the DERMATOGLYPHICS, including: fingerprints, palm dermatoglyphics;
6 – Palm Reading & SKIN QUALITY, including: colour, structure, tone;
7 – Palm Reading & HAND MOTORICS, including: flexibility, motoric hand index.

Read more about how Multi-Perspective Palm Reading varies from other types of hand reading & modern palmistry via the Wikipedia section: Modern Palmistry: science & criticism

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 1, 2011 at 11:55 pm

The History of Palm Reading – How the Indian Vedas relate to the latest Scientific Publications!

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 The earliest known written reference to palm reading in the World literature are found in two writings in the ancient Vedic literature of India: ‘The Laws of Manu’ and in the ‘Vasishtha Rules’ – which include a list of rules given to guide the ascetic in the correct way to lead the religious life. But what are the origins of the ‘idea’ of  palm reading: what is described about how it must have started?

First of all, while the world literature started around 3000 BC (written on clay tablets),  we have to be aware that the printed written literature on paper dates from about 400 years ago. 

Around that time an Indian Sanskrit text, titled: ‘Sariraka Shastra’, was published which includes Vedic stanzas that describe how ‘Hasta Samudrika Shastra’ (translated: ‘body knowledge of the hand’) has evolved in the early days of human kind. The text was translated by an Indian palmist (V.A.K Ayer) and published in 1960 under the title: “Sariraka Sastra – Indian Science of Hand Reading based on Kartikeyan System”. The book describes how long ago when Lord Vishnu was enjoying his ‘yoga nidra’ in the company of his consort Lakshmi, the sea-lord Samudra showed up and began to write down the auspicious marks on the bodies of the divine couple – for the guidance of humanity. This story explains how classic Indian Palmistry became an art of reading signs via the hand!

 

 The Laws of Manu:

“Manu was the legendary first man, the Adam of the Hindus.”

(Quoted from sacret-text.com)

Chapter X in “The Laws of Manu” describes as a guidance for the ascetic:

“21. ‘Neither by (explaining) prodigies and omens, nor by skill in astrology and palmistry, nor by casuistry and expositions (of the Sâstras), let him ever seek to obtain alms.'”

 

Inborn hand markers vs. Indian hand signs:

And in a way, the modern academic science of studying ‘minor physical anomalies’ is basically not really very different from how the Indians used palmistry to speculate about their future.

While the ancient Indians studied body signs to know the future of individuals (with a speculative philosophic purpose of course), is modern science basically interested in studying body signs to understand the etiology of diseases and disorders. And while the Indians formulated theories about ‘dynamic’ signs (which may change or even disappear in time), is modern science more focussed on inborn body markers.

So, while Indian palmists typically focuss on tiny little marks of the hand (lines, spots, moles, etc) – are modern hand researchers much more interested in relatively stable hand markers such as: the fingerprints, palmar dermatoglypics, simian crease and the so-called ‘digit ratio’ (= the finger length ratio between the index finger and the ring finger).

The new Palmistry?

Over the past few years quite a few academic researchers have published interesting studies which suggest that the hand can be used as prognostic marker for certain common diseases.

And the new Multi-Perspective Palm Reading represents a direct result of the many (tousands) studies that have been perfpormed so far on 100+ hand markers – read more about these developments via: What is Multi-Perspective Palm Reading?

But typically, these studies have been welcomed with a considerable dosis of scepticism. A few of recent examples of these reviews are presented below:

• April 2011: The New Palmistry?

• July 2010: Digit ratio: A measure of two hormonally-based temperament dimensions

• June 2010: Reading the Body – Finger Length Ratio predicts Athletic Ability!

• April 2009: Palmistry’s Digital Analgue?

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

April 30, 2011 at 2:11 am

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