Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Posts Tagged ‘hands

Learn how Your Hands may guide Your Brains to solve a Problem!

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CHICAGO, JUNE 2011 – New psychology research suggests that hand gestures unconsciously influence people’s problem solving strategy! Two experiments have shown that when people are confronted with a problem to solve, they don’t just use their brains but the rest of their bodies, too. “Being able to use your body in problem solving alters the way you solve the problems,” says University of Wisconsin psychology professor Martha Alibali. “Body movements are one of the resources we bring to cognitive processes.”

These conclusions, of a new study by Alibali and colleagues—Robert C. Spencer, also at the University of Wisconsin, and Lucy Knox and Sotaro Kita of the University of Birmingham—are augmented by another, counter-intuitive one – even when we are solving problems that have to do with motion and space, the inability to use the body may force us to come up with other strategies, and these may be more efficient.

The findings will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.


TWO EXPERIMENTS:

The study involved two experiments. The first recruited 86 American undergraduates, half of whom were prevented from moving their hands using Velcro gloves that attached to a board. The others were prevented from moving their feet, using Velcro straps attached to another board. The latter thus experienced the strangeness of being restricted, but also had their hands free.  From the other side of an opaque screen, the experimenter asked questions about gears in relation to each other—e.g., “If five gears are arranged in a line, and you move the first gear clockwise, what will the final gear do?” The participants solved the problems aloud and were videotaped.

The videotapes were then analyzed for the number of hand gestures the participants used (hand rotations or “ticking” movements, indicating counting); verbal explanations indicating the subject was visualizing those physical movements; or the use of more abstract mathematical rules, without reference to perceptual-motor processes.

Psychologist dr. Martha Alibali.

The results: The people who were allowed to gesture usually did so—and they also commonly used perceptual-motor strategies in solving the puzzles. The people whose hands were restrained, as well as those who chose not to gesture (even when allowed), used abstract, mathematical strategies much more often.

The findings evince deeper questions about the relationship of mind and body and their relationship to space, says Alibali. “As human thinkers, we use visual-spatial metaphors all the time to solve problems and conceptualize things—even in domains that don’t seem physical on their face. Adding is ‘up,’ subtracting is ‘down.’ A good mood is ‘high,’ a bad one is ‘low.’ This is the metaphoric structuring of our conceptual landscape.”

Alibali, who is also an educational psychologist, asks: “How we can harness the power of action and perception in learning?” Or, conversely: What about the cognitive strategies of people who cannot use their bodies? “They may focus on different aspects of problems,” she says. And, it turns out, they may be onto something the rest of us could learn from.

Obviously, by controling- or using your hands… you can stimulate your brains to find another strategy (in respective: an abstract- or verbal explanation) to solve a problem


More studies related to the connection between hand gestures & palm reading:

http://www.handresearch.com/news/hand-gestures.htm

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Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 10, 2011 at 4:40 am

The oldest ‘Portrait’ of Man is a 32.000 Years old Hand Print!

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Hand prints in on the walls of Chauvet Cave, southern France (width of each hand print is 8cm).

 The earliest known ‘portrait of man’ was found in Chauvet Cave (south-east of France) – which was discovered 1994. Containing the earliest known cave paintings, the cave art has been attributed to Aurignacian Man (c.35,000 BC) through the use of carbon dating. Interestingly, among the many cave paintings there are quite a lot of hand prints; one of those hand prints became known as ‘the oldest portrait of man‘ – made c.32.000 BC!

The oldest portrait of man - a 32.000 year old hand print found in Chauvet Cave, France.

Whereas some scholars consider these cave handprints to be early attempts at human artistic self-expression, others believe they must have magical significance. And because the hand prints occur in the innermost parts of caves, on the walls of which primitive men painted  pictures of horses, cattle, bears, mammoths, and other animals that roamed Europe in their epoch, it has been suggested that these locations must have been  places of prayer and magical ceremonies.

Since these were the main tools primitive people had to capture the animals they relied on for sustenance, the hands must have seemed not only mystical, but also symbolic of the entire human being. As Jack Mauduy says, if the hand print is taken to be the hand itself and, by an extension, the entire body, the spirit-strength within the hand can be thought to represent all of the energy stored in the entire being.

And today, the capturing of the hand prints of celebrities can in a way be perceived as a likewise ritual as the ancient art from the Chauvet cave in France. Nelson Mandela’s hand print art collection (see the picture below) is an example of this. 

Nelson Mandela's hand print art.

HAND PRINTS & RELIGIOUS CUSTOMS:

Religious customs associated with the hands still persist among premitive peoples today. For example, the African Bushmen cut of a finger to symbolize suffering at the loss of a family member or loved one. Other peoples cut of a finger to use a talisman against danger of plague. Plainsmen of New Guinea make hand prints of walls just as primitive man did twenty thousands years ago and cut of fingers to give to the gods in gratitude for good harvest. Interestingly, it seems that, as time passed, primitive people stopped performing bodily mutilation of this kind and resorted to finding mystical qualities in hand print, which came to replace severed digits and hands in their religious ceremonies.

Hand print of a Japanese Sumo wrestler.

HAND PRINTS AROUND THE WORLD:

 The same psychology maybe traceable in old Japanese customs of displaying on walls hand prints of Sumo wrestlers as charms and good-luck signs.

But there many likewise habits are found all over the world. Muslims, for example, use such a charm that looks like a hand with the five fingers extrended. And in some parts of Arabia, people make good-luck signs over the entrances to their houses by dipping their hands in sheep’s blood and pressing them against the wall.

In brief, since the dawn of civilization, human beings, not only in Europe, but also in Asia and Africa, have been fascinated by the mystical nature of the hands.

Hand print of 'James Bond 007' - Sir Sean Connery, Leicester - UK.

THE EARLIEST SIGNS OF PALM READING:

The ancient Indians  were the first to conceive the idea of telling a man’s ‘fate’ from his hands (3000 BC), and palm reading in New Delhi is still a classic source of entertainment for Western tourists. 

Then the ancient Chinese became known for being the first who associated man’s health with his hands (2500 BC), a palm reading in Hong Kong will nearly always include a reading of your ‘health’.

And the Greeks were probably the first who associated man’s psychology with his hands (350 BC). And maybe therefore it is not really surprizing that a palm reading in London will often include a reading of your ‘personality’!

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 6, 2011 at 9:25 pm

The Language of the Hand in Schizophrenia!

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Schizophrenia is a complex mental disorder which affects about 1% of people worldwide. People who suffer from schizophrenia experience problems perceiving the difference between real and unreal experiences – which results in psychotic experiences. And as a consequence schizophrenic people also are not able to think logically, to have normal emotional responses, and to behave normally in social situations. The hands become involved as well, because people who have schizophrenia typically also have impaired hand movement coordination.

Even brain experts are not sure what causes schizophrenia, but there is plenty of evidence which suggests that the brains are involved.


BRAINS & SCHIZOPHRENIA:

One of the most common is the dopamine hypothesis which attributes psychosis to the mind’s faulty interpretation of the misfiring of dopamineurgic neurons.

In the picture on the right presents the skull of twin persons of which one (right) is suffering on schizophrenia. It is fascinating to see the elonguation in the brain skull of the twin-person who suffers on schizophrenia. A likewise tendency is typical for the hand in schizophrenia, which tend to be long & slender!


HAND BEHAVIOR IN SCHIZOPHRENIA:

Atypical handedness is much more often seen among schizophrenics (20%) vs. controls (3.8%), which implicates that people who suffer on schizophrenia tend to develop ambiguous preferences for different tasks. Also they tend to developed impaired hand-motor performanceright handedness is in schizophrenics often featured with non-right eye preference.


HAND CHARACTERISTICS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA:

The hand in schizophrenia shows a large overlap with common hands, however in all perspectives of the hand ‘minor anomalies’ are seen much more often than in the general population. An overview of some of these typical characteristics is displayed in the ‘phantom picture’ for the hand in schizophrenia, see the picture below. However, it is not easy at all to identify a person who suffers on schizophrenia solely via a palm reading!

In order to recognize the hand of a schizophrenic person, the presence of significant hand characteristics in at least 4 perspectives of the hand is required. Both the palmar dermatoglyphics & fingerprints and the major hands lines are required to show assocatied characteristics. Plus two of the other five perspectives of the hand are required to be involved as well.


The following two articles present more details about typical hand characteristics in schizophrenia:

http://www.multiperspectivepalmreading.com/hands-schizophrenia-palm-reading.htm
http://www.handresearch.com/diagnostics/schizophrenia-simian-line-palm-reading.htm

Phantom picture for the hand in schizophrenia.

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 4, 2011 at 10:47 pm

How to diagnose Down syndrome from the hands only?

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Physical characteristics in Down syndrome.

Down syndrome (trisomy 21) is known as a genetic condition in which the person has 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. Down syndrome symptoms vary from person to person and can range from mild to severe (often featured with medical problems). However, children with Down syndrome have a widely recognized physical appearance. The hand characteristics in Down syndrome are very typical, and it is even possible to make a very reliable hand-diagnosis (with an accuracy beyond 99%).

Pregnant women can be screened for various complications during pregnancy. Many standard prenatal screens can discover Down syndrome, so sometimes the condition is already known before birth.

But when the condition has not yet been identified before birth, in most cases the typical physical characteristics are recognized shortly after birth through the face. And then doctors will make a quick inspection of the hands & feet in order to find out if further diagnostic tests are required.


HANDS & DOWN SYNDROME
:

The hand in Down’s syndrome varies significantly from the common hand. The most significant features manifest in a combination of the dermatoglyphics, the hand shape & the finger morphology. Some of the typical hand characteristics in Down’s syndrome are summarized in the picture below – many more details are summarized in the article: how to make a hand diagnosis for Down syndrome?

 


The hands of people who have Down syndrome are typically smaller than the common hand and they are featured with uncommon fingerprint distributions & palmar dermatoglyphics.

Usually the palms of these people are short, featured with a high positioned ‘axial triradius’ (the delta in the dermatoglyphics of the hypothenar – in palmistry / palm reading known as the mount of moon), and a majority also has a simian line or Sydney line.

The fingers are typically featured with ulnar loop fingerprints (possibly a radial loop on the ring finger and or pinky), short fingernails, thumb & pinky are typically very short, and especially the pinky finger can be featured with other minor physical anomalies (such as: clinodactlyly or a missing interphalangeal crease).


Read more about other hand characteristics in other themes:

http://www.multiperspectivepalmreading.com/palm-reading-themes.htm

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 30, 2011 at 2:34 pm

HAND ANTHROPOMETRY – From Leonardo Da Vinci to NASA & US army!

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Historically, Leonardo da Vinici’s ‘Vitruvian Man’ can be described as one of the earliest examples of anthropometry. The drawing was created by Leonardo da Vinci around the year 1487, and is accompanied by notes based on the work of the famed architect, Vitruvius.

The drawing, which is in pen and ink on paper, depicts a male figure in two superimposed positions with his arms and legs apart and simultaneously inscribed in a circle and square. The drawing and text are sometimes called the Canon of Proportions or, less often, Proportions of Man.

Interestingly, Leonardo’s comments for the proportions of th e ‘Vitruvian Man‘ includes a few passage where the hands and fingers are mentioned, quote:

“For the human body is so designed by nature that the face, from the chin to the top of the forehead and the lowest roots of the hair, is a tenth part of the whole height; the open hand from the wrist to the tip of the middle finger is just the same; the head from the chin to the crown is an eighth, and with the neck and shoulder from the top of the breast to the lowest roots of the hair is a sixth; from the middle of the breast to the summit of the crown is a fourth. If we take the height of the face itself, the distance from the bottom of the chin to the under side of the nostrils is one third of it; the nose from the under side of the nostrils to a line between the eyebrows is the same; from there to the lowest roots of the hair is also a third, comprising the forehead. The length of the foot is one sixth of the height of the body; of the forearm, one fourth; and the breadth of the breast is also one fourth. The other members, too, have their own symmetrical proportions, and it was by employing them that the famous painters and sculptors of antiquity attained to great and endless renown. Similarly, in the members of a temple there ought to be the greatest harmony in the symmetrical relations of the different parts to the general magnitude of the whole. Then again, in the human body the central point is naturally the navel. For if a man be placed flat on his back, with his hands and feet extended, and a pair of compasses centred at his navel, the fingers and toes of his two hands and feet will touch the circumference of a circle described therefrom. And just as the human body yields a circular outline, so too a square figure may be found from it. For if we measure the distance from the soles of the feet to the top of the head, and then apply that measure to the outstretched arms, the breadth will be found to be the same as the height, as in the case of plane surfaces which are perfectly square.”

Leonardo da Vinci’s comment about the proportion of the average hand was quite right, but the field of anthropometry has later developed more precise methods in order to describe the most important individual variations concerning the human body. Various sources of anthropometric hand data indicate the average hand length is close to 11% of body height (usually slightly smaller).


ANTHROPOMETRY TODAY:

Today, anthropometry plays an important role in industrial design, clothing design, ergonomics and architecture where statistical data about the distribution of body dimensions in the population are used to optimize products.


DATA FROM THE NASA & US ARMY:
 

In the last decade of the 20 century reports became available developed by the NASA & the US army – which include data for at least 20 characteristics of the human hand shape, including e.g. hand length, hand breadth & finger length. The data in the picture above represents static human physical characteristics of the adult hand, presented in 2000 by the Department of Defense Human Factors Engineering Technical Advisory Group.

The picture below presents at the bottom some average data based on German, UK & American populations – which provide useful ‘points of reference’ in the perspective of biometry & Multi-Perspective Palm Reading.


Finally, regarding Leonardo da Vinci it might be interesting to notice here that in 2008 a report was published describing characteristics of his fingerprint:

http://www.handresearch.com/news/leonardo-da-vinci-fingerprint.htm

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 29, 2011 at 2:40 am

VIDEO: The Evolution of the Human Hand!

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The Youtube video titled: ‘Evolution of the human hand’ – displays a detailed picture of what modern science knows (based on Darwin’s evolution theory) about how the structure & shape of the human hand changed & developed during the last 1.8 million years in the evolution of human kind.

The video demonstrates how the ‘early’ humanoid hands (and primates) are typically featured with 3 or more ‘complete transverse creases’ (multiple simian lines), which are positioned horizontal in the hand + two major vertical lines. While at the end of the video displays a typical human hand featured with only 2 curved, oblique positioned ‘primary palmar creases’ (heart line and head line) + one major vertical line (life line).

Many other fascinating details about the evolution of the human hand are described in the work of physician John Napier, titled: Hands.

Another important figure in the history of medical science was the Scottish surgeon John Hunter, who turned the attention of science from the structure of hands to it’s function:

“Structure is the intimate expression of function”

– John Hunter, Scottish surgeon (1728-1793) –


More details about the evolution of other features of the human hand are presented in the articles:

1) The evolution & mystery of the five fingers

2) The history & evolution of the palmar lines

The hand of early hominids (30.000 years old).

The hand of Neanderthals (300.000 years old).

The hand of 'Ardi' (4.4 million years old).

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 27, 2011 at 4:45 am

How to classify the palmar lines: the simian line, Sydney line & the Suwon crease!

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The study of the palmar lines [folding creases] traces back to the ancient civilisations of the Chinese and Indians as early as 3,000 years B.C. Historically the palmar lines have been adopted as the most important ‘tool’ of the classic Indian palmist with the purpose for ‘the guidance of humanity’. This explains why in all regions of the world the palmar lines became synonymous with the stigma of fortune telling (advocated by so-called ‘predictive palmistry’) – and subsequently debarring the hand lines from the scientific courts.

However, since the end of the 19th century the hand lines have been adopted by scientific researchers for other purposes, including: anthropological classification, personal identification (though the fingerprints are more well-known for this purpose), and hand lines also have a diagnostic purpose!

The combination of the heart line (distal transverse crease) & head line (proximal transverse crease) could be described as representing the most important aspect of the palm lines. The typical characteristics of these two so-called ‘transverse creases‘ (= heart line + head line) can be described as follows (see also the picture above):

• COMMON LINES: The heart line & the head line typically manifest as 2 unconnected lines, and only in human hands these lines typically do not cross the full palm (in the primate palm there are usually mulitiple horizontal lines which cross the full palm).

• SYDNEY LINE: The Sydney line can be recognized by the presence of an extended head line which crosses the full palm, combined with the presence of a normal heart line (both lines are required not to connect/fuse with eachother). NOTICE: From a scientific point, in medical science the Sydney line has been recognized in medical science as a ‘minor physical anomaly’ (MPA), and it became also known as a typical marker for e.g. the hand in Down syndrome, the hand in fragile-X syndrome, the hand in psoriasis & the hand in Schizophrenia. The name‘Sydney line’ was introduced in 1968 by Australian researcher S.G. Purvis-Smith who reported a high prevalance of Sydney lines in patients with congenital rubella. 

• EXTENDED HEART LINE: The extended heart line can be recognized by the presence of a very long heart line which crosses the full palm, combined with the presence of a normal head line (both lines are required not to connect/fuse with eachother). NOTICE: From a scientific point of view there is not much know about the extended heart line.

• SIMIAN CREASE: The simian crease can be recognized by the presence of a fusion between the head line and the heart line – resulting in the impression that one of both lines is missing. NOTICE: From a scientific point, in medical science the simian line has been recognized as a ‘minor physical anomaly’ (MPA), and it became also known as a typical marker for e.g. many syndromes (including Down syndrome) and many diseases such as the hand diabetes mellitusthe hand in rheumatoid arthritis. The name simian line was introduced in 1877 by French physician Paul Broca who described it as an unusual characteristic for the human hand.


• SUWON CREASE:
The Suwon crease can be recognized by the presence of two complete head lines (not a splitting head line, nor an interrupted head line), and the upper head line fuses/connects with the heart line. NOTICE: The history of the Suwon crease is still very young: it was first described in 2010 by Korean researchers, who found it only in 0.7% of a large Korean sample of 3.532 male hands (in the 1664 female hands it was never observed).


Read more about how hand lines relate to intelligence & personality related characteristics:

http://www.handresearch.com/diagnostics/hand-line-studies-formations-in-lines.htm

An advanced definition of various types of palmar creases.

 

The Korean researchers have presented in 2010 a new detailed method for classifying the various types of palmar lines, which includes some interesting elements which can be applied in Multi-Perspective Palm Reading:

 
“Definition of major and minor palm creases. Major palm creases are defined as follows. Radial longitudinal crease (I) becomes distinct according to the flexion of carpometacarpal joints of the thumb. Proximal (II) and distal transverse creases (III) become distinct according to the flexion of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the second to fifth fingers. Minor palm creases are defined as palm creases which are narrower than the two times of the epidermal groove width in palmprints (1), apart from major palm creases (2), crossing major palm creases (3), or leading to major palm creases by the sharpened end (4).”

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 25, 2011 at 10:30 pm

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