Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Posts Tagged ‘heart defects

The Embryology behind Hand Clues for Congenital Heart defects!

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 In the last post a few hand markers were described which signal the presence of congenital heart defects. How come that hands present clues about congenital heart defects?

The answer is relatively simple: the basic structure of both the hands & the heart is developed in the same period of the prenatal development. Below follows an overview of landmark developments in the heart and the hands from week 4 to week 8 after conception.


WEEK 4 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: A pipe-shaped heart is formed and begins to beat.

– HANDS: – (the hands are not yet formed)

 

 

WEEK 5 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: A dividing wall is formed in the heart (heartbeat continues in one chamber).

– HANDS: The hands are shaped like paddles.

 


 WEEK 6 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: The heart has devided into right and left chambers.

– HANDS: Finger soon take shape.

 

 


 WEEK 7 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: The main structure of the heart is now complete.

– HANDS: Fingers are forming, but are still joined by webs of skin; the ‘volar pads’ become manifest which preceed the formation of the fingerprints – notice: the shape of the ‘volar pads’ correlates with the fingerprint type that is later formed.

 


 WEEK 8 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: Continues growing.

– HANDS: As the hands develop they have lost their paddle like look. The touch pads of the fingers form and already have fingerprints.


More details are available in the article:

The embryology & the morphogenesis of the hand lines 

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 4, 2011 at 2:22 am

Fingerprints reveal Clues about Congenital Heart Defects!

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 In an earlier post a report was made that fingerprints reveal clues about many things – including: sexe, race, diet, lifestyle and disease. Fingerprint ridge width & the so-called ‘minituae’ provide info about sexe.

In this new report we’ll focuss on a few details in the fingerprint of the pinky finger.

 


Pinky fingers are usually featured with an ulnar loop:

The World Map of Fingerprints has shown that in all nations around the world the pinky fingerprint is dominated by the presence of an ‘ulnar loop’.

And in a study among 5 world populations (N=2.785) in 78% of the individuals the pinky finger is featured with an ‘ulnar loop’. The study also revealed that the effect size for fingerprints & sexe and fingerprints & ethnic difference is the largest in the pinky finger.

Other studies (Loesch, 1983) have revealed that when a pinky finger is featured with a whorl or arch, the ring finger is usually featured with the same fingerprint pattern type. In other words: the fingerprint type on the pinky finger typically highly depends on the fingerprints of the other fingers – especially the ring finger.

This implicates that the fingerprint type displayed by the little finger hardly provides any clues – because usually it’s an ‘ulnar loop’ and otherwise it correlates with the fingerprint on the ring finger.


Ridge count in pinky fingers:

However, beyond the fingerprint pattern type, another aspect of the fingerprint may reveal more specified meaningful information.

The earlier report explained how fingerprint ridge density & minituae (dermatoglyphics) correlate with sexe – especially when applied to the pinky finger.

 But there is another revealing aspects: the so-called ‘ridge count’.

For example: in 1989 a study revealed that the ridge count in the left pinky finger can become highly meaningful when it is summarized with the ridge count of the five finger of the right hand minus the ridge count of the five fingers of the left hand. In a population of people with congenital heart defects in Down syndrome, the summation outcome was typically (in 10 out of 13 individuals) lower than the ridge count of the left pinky finger itself. While among the control population (people who have Down syndrome without congenital heart defects) the same result was relatively rare (in only 1 out of 38 individuals).

One can understand this rather remarkable example of palm reading in the perspective of the fact that usually in the fingers of the right hand the ridge count is typically higher than in the fingers of the left hand (this effect is often largest in the thumb).


 Read more about how these results & dermatoglyphics can be understand in the perspective of hand developments & life in the uterus:

http://www.handresearch.com/news/fingerprint-characteristic-early-prenatal-environment.htm

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 3, 2011 at 4:19 am

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