Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Posts Tagged ‘heart

The Embryology behind Hand Clues for Congenital Heart defects!

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 In the last post a few hand markers were described which signal the presence of congenital heart defects. How come that hands present clues about congenital heart defects?

The answer is relatively simple: the basic structure of both the hands & the heart is developed in the same period of the prenatal development. Below follows an overview of landmark developments in the heart and the hands from week 4 to week 8 after conception.


WEEK 4 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: A pipe-shaped heart is formed and begins to beat.

– HANDS: – (the hands are not yet formed)

 

 

WEEK 5 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: A dividing wall is formed in the heart (heartbeat continues in one chamber).

– HANDS: The hands are shaped like paddles.

 


 WEEK 6 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: The heart has devided into right and left chambers.

– HANDS: Finger soon take shape.

 

 


 WEEK 7 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: The main structure of the heart is now complete.

– HANDS: Fingers are forming, but are still joined by webs of skin; the ‘volar pads’ become manifest which preceed the formation of the fingerprints – notice: the shape of the ‘volar pads’ correlates with the fingerprint type that is later formed.

 


 WEEK 8 AFTER CONCEPTION:

– HEART: Continues growing.

– HANDS: As the hands develop they have lost their paddle like look. The touch pads of the fingers form and already have fingerprints.


More details are available in the article:

The embryology & the morphogenesis of the hand lines 

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 4, 2011 at 2:22 am

Fingerprints reveal Clues about Congenital Heart Defects!

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 In an earlier post a report was made that fingerprints reveal clues about many things – including: sexe, race, diet, lifestyle and disease. Fingerprint ridge width & the so-called ‘minituae’ provide info about sexe.

In this new report we’ll focuss on a few details in the fingerprint of the pinky finger.

 


Pinky fingers are usually featured with an ulnar loop:

The World Map of Fingerprints has shown that in all nations around the world the pinky fingerprint is dominated by the presence of an ‘ulnar loop’.

And in a study among 5 world populations (N=2.785) in 78% of the individuals the pinky finger is featured with an ‘ulnar loop’. The study also revealed that the effect size for fingerprints & sexe and fingerprints & ethnic difference is the largest in the pinky finger.

Other studies (Loesch, 1983) have revealed that when a pinky finger is featured with a whorl or arch, the ring finger is usually featured with the same fingerprint pattern type. In other words: the fingerprint type on the pinky finger typically highly depends on the fingerprints of the other fingers – especially the ring finger.

This implicates that the fingerprint type displayed by the little finger hardly provides any clues – because usually it’s an ‘ulnar loop’ and otherwise it correlates with the fingerprint on the ring finger.


Ridge count in pinky fingers:

However, beyond the fingerprint pattern type, another aspect of the fingerprint may reveal more specified meaningful information.

The earlier report explained how fingerprint ridge density & minituae (dermatoglyphics) correlate with sexe – especially when applied to the pinky finger.

 But there is another revealing aspects: the so-called ‘ridge count’.

For example: in 1989 a study revealed that the ridge count in the left pinky finger can become highly meaningful when it is summarized with the ridge count of the five finger of the right hand minus the ridge count of the five fingers of the left hand. In a population of people with congenital heart defects in Down syndrome, the summation outcome was typically (in 10 out of 13 individuals) lower than the ridge count of the left pinky finger itself. While among the control population (people who have Down syndrome without congenital heart defects) the same result was relatively rare (in only 1 out of 38 individuals).

One can understand this rather remarkable example of palm reading in the perspective of the fact that usually in the fingers of the right hand the ridge count is typically higher than in the fingers of the left hand (this effect is often largest in the thumb).


 Read more about how these results & dermatoglyphics can be understand in the perspective of hand developments & life in the uterus:

http://www.handresearch.com/news/fingerprint-characteristic-early-prenatal-environment.htm

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 3, 2011 at 4:19 am

Hands signs in Marfan syndrome: thin fingers, long hand shape & hypermobility!

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Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder characterised by a tall, slender body featured with long limbs & long thin fingers. The most serious complications are the defects of the heart valves and the aorta, which could lead to an aortic rupture (due to too much stress on the aorta), which is usually fatal. However, many people who have this disorder are not aware of it – partly because Marfan syndrome typically becomes manifest only after the age of 5. But there are hand signs that have a highly reliable diagnostic value!

Marfan syndrome is featured with many typical hand characteristics, however a combination of two specific hands signs related to a long hand shape (hand signs) & hand motorics (joint hypermobility) is often enough to identify the disorder.

THE STEINBERG SIGN (a):

This test is used for the clinical evaluation of Marfan patients.

Procedure:
Instruct the patient to fold his thumb into the closed fist. This test is positive if the thumb tip extends from palm of hand (see figure a).

THE WALKER-MURDOCH SIGN (b):

This test is used for the evaluation of patients with Marfan syndrome.

Procedure:
Instruct the patient to grip his wrist with his opposite hand. If thumb and fifth finger of the hand overlap with each other, this represents a positive Walker-Murdoch sign (see figure b).

 JOINT HYPERMOBILITY

How to check if a person has hypermobility? You can check this easily by doing the 5 tests that are included in the so-called ‘Beighton score‘:  see figure 1.

A ‘Beighton score’ of 4 or above usually indicates hypermobility.

And if a person has the Sternberg sign + Walker-Murdoch sign + hypermobility, the chances are close to 90% that the person has Marfan syndrome.

The presence of other related hand markers such as: skin quality (hyperextensiblity), a simian crease, extra digital transverse creases, or a high positioned axial triradius provide other hand signs which are indicative for a person to have a medical diagnosis for Marfan syndrome.

Marfan hands.

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 20, 2011 at 3:39 pm

Why is the Ring Finger associated with Marriage?

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Why is the ringfinger associated with marriage?

The ring finger has been associated with the wearing of rings in married men and women since the Roman times. And this tradition appears to origin in the early belief that a nerve, vein or artery runs directly from the 4th digit to the heart, and therefore it became judged to be the seat of the emotions. However, medical science today does not present  any anatomical evidence that confirms this early belief.  Nevertheless, there are other explanations why the ring finger became associated with marriage!

Despite the missing of anatomical evidence for a connection with the heart, there is alternative evidence which suggest that wearing a ring on the ring finger can be associated with the ‘control’ of brute emotions.


CASANOVA:

Anecdotal evidence is found in the memoirs of Giacomo Casanova from Venice, who became known as one of the most famous ‘womanisers’ of all times. Casanova’s life as an adventurous writer took him across Europe, and in his memoirs about his stay in Spain we learn of the relative length of his fingers. Casanova described a dispute with the painter Anton Raphael Mengs about the ‘human condition’ of the ratio between the index finger and the ring finger. While Menge was claiming that his longer index finger was the correct human condition, Casanova claimed that his long finger was ”like that of all the children descended from Adam’.

But Casanova was not aware that his claim was basically only true for men only!


COMMITMENT:

Professor John Manning from the UK presented two books devoted to the ‘2D:4D digit ratio’. In his first book, Manning presented some evidence that the wearing of rings in married women can be understood as an act of ‘advertising’ their commitment to their marriage.

Additionally, the study also demonstrated that a considerable lower percentage of the married men (29%) was wearing a ring on their ring finger – while the percentage was considerably higher for the married women (71%).


PRENATAL MARKER:

Today especially the length of the ring finger became known as a prenatal marker for masculinity, and in all regions of the world studies have confirmed that in males the absolute length of the ring finger is usually longer than the absolute length of the index finger. And some studies have pointed out that the sexual dimorphism in finger measures is even more strongly expressed in the distal extent of fingertips than in the length of fingers.

In his second book ‘The Finger book’ Prof. John Manning describes a few references to scientific studies dating back to the 19th and early 20 century:

“The ‘Casanova pattern’ in the fingers is considered by some to be the mark of an ugly hand – an atavistic hand recalling brute instincts and behaviours, modelling the forms of the fingers of our monkey relatives. Thus the ‘beast’ in us is represented by the ring finger while the ‘beauty’ resides in the index finger. This notion has led to suggestions that the femininised ‘Mengs pattern’ is of a purer type, a hand which signifies emancipation from our primate ancestry. … Science, however, has been slow to identify the importance of such connections. That there is a sex difference in the relative length of men’s and women’s fing and index fingers has been known for more than a century. Compared to sex differences arising at puberty the finger ratio is modest in its size and visibility, and it has been neglegted.”

These considerations provide an explanation about why the 4th finger became known as the ‘ring finger’. The ringfinger became also known as the 4th finger or the annulus (digitus annularis).


BOOKS:

 The following books about fingers are highly recommended to read much more about fingers (presenting various elements that can be described as ‘building stones’ in Mult-Perspective Palm Reading):

Fingerology (2010), authors: Hillary J. Kener & Michael Zeide

The Finger Book (2008), author: John T. Manning

Digit Ratio (2002), author: John T. Manning

  

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 5, 2011 at 3:53 pm

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