Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Posts Tagged ‘marfan syndrome

A Hand-Test for recognizing Marfan syndrome!

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In may 2011 a detailed report was presented at this blog about how a ‘multi-perspective’ approach to the hand can be used to find the most essential hand characteristics in Marfan syndrome. Dozens of comments, questions and suggestions were made in response.

Time for a more detailed report:

The brand new ‘Marfan Syndrome Hand Test’ (see above) provides you a unique opportunity to make a first check-up for Marfan syndrome via your own hands!

The most discriminating hand featured typical for Marfan syndrome are included in this test – including: various aspects of arachnodactyly (spider fingers), which manifest via the hand shape; various guidelines for recognizing skin hyperelasticity, which relates to the hand skin quality; and a short list of hand signs for hypermobility, which relates to the hand motorics.

More details about the hand in Marfan syndrome and the background of this test are presented at HandResearch.com:
http://www.handresearch.com/diagnostics/marfan-syndrome-hand-test.htm 

(Your thoughts & observations are welcome!) 

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Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 7, 2012 at 6:04 pm

FINGERTIP BIOMETRY – Fingertips Signal Clues for Schizophrenia!

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Many studies have revealed that syndromes & diseases become manifest in hand functions & many aspects in the morphology of the hands. Interestingly, a closer look a the studies performed so far indicates that for the hand in schizophrenia the significance of the fingertips is more important than in other disorders!

A person diagnosed with schizophrenia may experience hallucinations (most reported are hearing voices), delusions (often bizarre or persecutory in nature), and disorganized thinking and speech. But there are no symptoms which are seen in all schizophrenic patients.

 In order to understand the connection between hands and schizophrenia thorougly, it is important to be aware of the essential difference between the so-calledpositive symptoms‘ and ‘negative symptoms. Because some of the fingertip characteristics in schizophrenia are associated with only category of the symptoms! (More details will be revealed later)

NOTICE:  The ‘positive symptoms’ in schizoprenia are those symptoms that most individuals do not normally experience but are present in people with schizophrenia (such as: hallucinations & disordered speech). And the ‘negative symptoms‘ are deficits of normal emotional responses or of other thought processes, and respond less well to medication (such as: blunted affect & poverty of speech).


FIVE FINGERTIP DIMENSIONS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA!

A closer study of the reports published so far, unveals that in schizophrenia at least 5 dimensions of the fingertips  provide significant clues, including:

FINGERTIP DIMENSION 1 – Fingerprints:

– 1a: extralimital triradii (prevalence: 6.6% in schizophrenics vs. 1.5% in controls);
– 1b: fingerprint type asymmetry on 3 or more fingers.

FINGERTIP DIMENSION 2 – Fingernails:

– small & underdeveloped (prevalence: 18.8% in schizophrenics vs. 2.0% in controls).

FINGERTIP DIMENSION 3 – Shape:

– 3a: short length is typical (prevalence: unknown);
– 3b: spatulate is typical (prevalence: 42.4% in schizophrenics vs 21.7% in controls).

FINGERTIP DIMENSION 4 – Skin:

– blood vessels in proximal nail fold are visible (prevalence: 20-70% in schizophrenics vs. 3-7% in controls);

FINGERTIP DIMENSION 5 – Creases:

– excessive (prevalence: unknown);

(The sources for the percentages are listed in the article: How to make a Palm Reading Assessment
for SCHIZOPHRENIA?
)


 FINGERTIPS & THE BRAIN:

Interestingly, there appears to be a connection as well regarding how schizophrenia is linked with the brain! Because after Penfield described in his cortical homunculus (see the picture on the right) in the 1940’s how the primary somatosensory cortex is linked with e.g. the fingertips, brain studies have later revealed that schizophrenia is often featured with abnormalities in the same region of the brain (+ other near located parts of the brain, including: the thalamus & frontal lobe). 


FINGERTIP DIMENSIONS IN OTHER DISORDERS?:

The following summary shows that only three out of the five fingertip dimensions that provide significant clues for schizophrenia, also display significant clues in 6 other diseases & syndromes that are well known for displaying significant hand markers. Only rheumatoid arthritis provides clues in these three fingertip dimensions!
 

FINGERTIP DIMENSION 1 – Fingerprints:

Significant for the hand in Down syndrome, the hand in diabetes mellitus, the hand in fragile-X syndrome, and the hand in rheumatoid arthritis.

FINGERTIP DIMENSION 2 – Fingernails:

Significiant for the hand in Down syndrome, the hand in diabetes mellitus, the hand in Marfan syndrome, the hand in psoriasis, and the hand in rheumatoid arthritis.

FINGERTIP DIMENSION 3 – Shape:

Significant for the hand in Marfan syndrome, the hand in psoriasis, and the hand in rheumatoid arthritis.

FINGERTIP DIMENSION 4 – Skin:

No significant markers for any of the six studied diseases & syndromes.

FINGERTIP DIMENSION 5 – Creases:

No significant markers for any of the six studied diseases & syndromes.

These materials indicate that a significant part of the correlations between the hands & schizophrenia is found at the fingertips. To be continued!

Penrose's brain homunculus describes how the fingertips relate to the primary somatosensory cortex & the primary somatomotoric cortex.

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 12, 2011 at 10:22 pm

Hands signs in Marfan syndrome: thin fingers, long hand shape & hypermobility!

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Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder characterised by a tall, slender body featured with long limbs & long thin fingers. The most serious complications are the defects of the heart valves and the aorta, which could lead to an aortic rupture (due to too much stress on the aorta), which is usually fatal. However, many people who have this disorder are not aware of it – partly because Marfan syndrome typically becomes manifest only after the age of 5. But there are hand signs that have a highly reliable diagnostic value!

Marfan syndrome is featured with many typical hand characteristics, however a combination of two specific hands signs related to a long hand shape (hand signs) & hand motorics (joint hypermobility) is often enough to identify the disorder.

THE STEINBERG SIGN (a):

This test is used for the clinical evaluation of Marfan patients.

Procedure:
Instruct the patient to fold his thumb into the closed fist. This test is positive if the thumb tip extends from palm of hand (see figure a).

THE WALKER-MURDOCH SIGN (b):

This test is used for the evaluation of patients with Marfan syndrome.

Procedure:
Instruct the patient to grip his wrist with his opposite hand. If thumb and fifth finger of the hand overlap with each other, this represents a positive Walker-Murdoch sign (see figure b).

 JOINT HYPERMOBILITY

How to check if a person has hypermobility? You can check this easily by doing the 5 tests that are included in the so-called ‘Beighton score‘:  see figure 1.

A ‘Beighton score’ of 4 or above usually indicates hypermobility.

And if a person has the Sternberg sign + Walker-Murdoch sign + hypermobility, the chances are close to 90% that the person has Marfan syndrome.

The presence of other related hand markers such as: skin quality (hyperextensiblity), a simian crease, extra digital transverse creases, or a high positioned axial triradius provide other hand signs which are indicative for a person to have a medical diagnosis for Marfan syndrome.

Marfan hands.

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 20, 2011 at 3:39 pm

HAND MOTORICS – Hands, Hypermobility & a Hand Motor Quiz!

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Hands are by far the most differentiated multi-functional tools of the body. Women usually have more talent for tasks that require the use of fine hand motor skills (involving the fingers). While men have more talent for tasks that require more forcefull & spatial hand motor skills (where the arm becomes involved). But sometimes these ‘hand talents’ are featured with a serious handicap!

The hand motorics of individuals can vary significantly, and the individual difference can manifest skills that relate to e.g. flexibility, mobility, strength, handedness, sensation & hand gestures. But this is common knowledge for quite a while

HANDS & HYPERMOBILITY:

An example of how a ‘hand talent’ can be featured with a servious handicap concerns having hyperflexible hands, which is also known as ‘double jointed thumbs’ or ‘hypermobile fingers’.

People who have this hand characteristic are often able to ‘show’ their talent by making funny gestures such as seen in the picture above. However, hypermobility in the hands may also be symptomatic of a serious medical condition, such as: the hand in Down’s syndrome, the hand in fragile-X syndrome,  the hand in Marfan syndrome & the hand in rheumatoid arthritis.

And in those cases Multi-Perspective Palm Reading will become helpfull to discriminate by other hand characteristics – such as e.g. hand shape – which problem is involved. A classic source for learning more about how the hand relates to human behavior & diseases is Dr. Theodore J. Berry‘s  work The Hand as a mirror of Systemic Disease (1963)

A SIMPLE HAND MOTOR QUIZ!

Below are the hand in 4 disorders displayed, including (listed by alphabetic order):

1 – Marfan syndrome;
2 – Down syndrome; 
3 – rheumatoid arthritis. 

Can you recognize in the picture below which of these three disorders belongs to the hands A, B and C…???

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 19, 2011 at 12:17 am

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