Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Posts Tagged ‘palmistry

Palm Reading Books TOP 100: The Bestsellers ranked by Amazon Bestsellers Rank!

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How to recognize a good book about Palm Reading? Asking the experts in the fields of hand reading may result in completely different choices! But the sales statistics provides by Amazon provide an objective measure for the popularity of books about palm reading, hand analysis & palmistry.

The Palmistry Books TOP 100 presents an overview of the most popular books in the fields of palm reading, hand analysis, chirology, hand reading, palmistry, chiromancy, chirognomy, etc.

But not all books are written professional palm readers: quite a few of the most popular books have been written by authors who also write about many other topics!

NOTICE: The rankings are based on statistics provided by Amazon. In february 2011 presented a new ranking system and with a few weeks the first new update will be presented based on their new ranking system (the new average Amazon Bestsellers Rank was preceeded by the fomer Amazon Sales Rank). Afterwards the stats will be updated regularly – about twice a year.

 
CHECK OUT THE RANKINGS OF THE BOOKS TOP 100 AT:

http://www.handresearch.com/book/palmistry-books-top-100-palm-reading.htm


AN OVERVIEW OF BOOKS THAT ARE USEFUL FOR APPLYING THE RULES OF MULTI-PERSPECTIVE PALM READING IS AVAILABLE HERE:

http://www.multiperspectivepalmreading.com/palm-reading-books.htm

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Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 17, 2011 at 1:25 am

Palm Reading TOP 100: the most popular websites about Hand Analysis & Palmistry!

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 Palm reading is often described as is the art of characterization (popular in Western countries) & foretelling (popular in Eastern countries) the future through the study of the hands – via especially the palmar lines & signs. However, the truth is that palm reading is a much more diverse field than people usually assume. The service provided by a palm reader may differ significiantly!

The Palmistry Websites TOP 100 presents an overview of the most popular websites in the fields of palm reading, hand analysis, chirology, hand reading, palmistry, chiromancy, chirognomy, etc. All websites are presented by professional & amateur palm readers!

NOTICE: The rankings are based on internet statistics provided by Google (Page Rank), SeoMoz (Page Authority) & Alexa (Reach), and the stats are updated regularly – about twice a year. 

 Including the rankings for each of the six continents!


CHECK OUT THE RANKINGS OF THE TOP 100 AT:

http://www.handresearch.com/top100/palmistry-top-100.htm

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 9, 2011 at 2:24 pm

The Modern Hand Reading Forum celebrates it’s 1st Anniversary!

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In the summer of 2010 the ‘Modern Hand Reading Forum was founded as a place where (professional) palm reader experts, students & laymen can share their interests about hands. Last week the forum celebrates it’s first anniversary. A short overview of the developments inside the forum!

With over 700 members (almost 10% are palm reading professionals) and over 500+ daily visitors the Modern Hand Reading Forum became a place where assistance & expertise is shared 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 

The forum includes 40+ sub-sections, including: Questions & Answers (section II), Modern Hand Reading (section III), Hand Reading Resources (section IV), the History of Palmistry (section V), and Famous Hands (section VI).

The forum offers e.g.:

– Free assistance by some very experienced Palmistry, Hand Analysis & Chirology experts in the world!
– A rich history of sources, discussions and shared palm reading materials!

– And of course… a section devoted to Multi-Perspective Palm Reading! (Section III-b)


You can come and take a look inside the forum via:

http://www.modernhandreadingforum.com

 
PS. NOTICE: You can take a look into the forum without joining; if you would like to participate in the discussions your will have to join and become a member!!!

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 28, 2011 at 11:11 pm

The Sydney Line & the Simian Crease are like ‘Fraternal Twins’!

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Normal palm creases - simian crease - Sydney line.

 Many people are fimiliar with the concept of a simian crease, but there is a likewise fascinating line that has a likewise significance: the Sydney line. In modern medical science both the simian crease & the Sydney line became known as a ‘minor physical anomaly’!

In a 1967 Belgian study Vrydagh-Laoureux pointed out that next to the well-known simian crease (or ‘simian line’ – which became well-known for it’s significance in Down syndrome), there is actually another hand line variant that is associated with related to Down’s syndrome. In the Belgian study this line was described as an ‘extended proximal palmar crease’.

NOTICE: In the traditional palmistry vocabulary this line is often described as: an ‘extended’ or very long head line.

Interestingly, only one year later Australian researchers (Purvis-Smith & Menser, 1968) found that this fascinating palmar line is also frequently found in the hands of patients with congenital rubella – and from that point this ‘fraternal twins line’ of the simian crease has been named: the Sydney line (or sometimes named: ‘Sydney crease’). This twin-analogy could become valuable because many people often find it difficult to discriminate a simian line from a Sydney line!

Example of the Sydney line presented by Purvis-Smith (1972).

Purvis-Smith defined the Sydney line as follows:

“A sydney line occurs where the proximal transverse crease extends beyond the midline axis of the fifth finger towards the ulnar border of the palm the ulnar border of the palm.” (Purvis-Smith, 1972) 


MINOR PHYSICAL ANOMALIES:

At the end of 20 century a new trend became appearant within the medical scientific community. Researchers began study so-called ‘minor physical anomalies‘ – which concern typically harmless inborn physical markers (that are typically associated with a specific prenatal period) – that have been associated in various disorders.

And especially in the 21 century this approach became popular among researchers who are studying the etiology of e.g. autism, ADHD, Down syndrome, hypoxia & schizophrenia.


MULTI-PERSPECTIVE PALM READING:

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading demonstrates how the Sydney line & simian crease can be understood as a likewise hand line markers. Because (so far) a wide range of studies indicates that in far most diseases & syndromes where the simian crease has been recognized as a significant body marker… the Sydney line became recognized as a likewise significant body marker.

This pattern is seen e.g. in: diabetes mellitus, Down syndrome, fragile-X syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and schizophrenia!

Finally, discussion in the Modern Hand Reading Forum have shown that – despite the fact that a Sydney line and a simian line can never be observed in one hand – for many people it quite hard to discriminate a Sydney line from a simian crease. The picture below presents a few fundamental clues which could become helpful to understand the essential components of both lines.

NOTICE: A ‘common hand’ is featured with a life line [I], a head line [II], and a heart line [III]; and various hand line variations can be summarized with the following formulas [IIx = extended head line; II+III = simian crease]:

• COMMON HAND = I + II + III
SYDNEY LINE = I + IIx + III
SIMIAN LINE = I + II-III

Obviously, there is a fundamental difference between the Sydney line and simian crease – therefore it appears more appropriate to describe them as ’fraternal twin lines’ instead of ‘identical twin lines’; because while they have a common nature… their manifestion shape is definitiely not identical.


More details are discussed in the following discussion:

http://www.modernhandreadingforum.com/t861p120-how-to-discriminate-a-simian-crease-from-a-sydney-line-and-a-suwon-crease

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 25, 2011 at 3:27 am

The Professor in Psychology who Started his Career as a Palm Reader!

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Ray Hyman, Prof. in Psychology.

‘No-no!’ This is not the story of the  British ‘finger-professor’ Professor John T. Manning – who became famous for his finger length ratio studies.

This is the story of another psychologist: Professor Ray Hyman! Who started his career in psychology at Boston University (USA) with a rather remarkable experience in the field of palm reading. In a 2007 interview he told the story of how he got interested in the ‘psychology of self-deception’. As a college student, he tried to earn some money as a palm reader by read several books on the art of ‘palmistry’. However… he didn’t believe any of it!

However, young Hyman got so much positive feedback from his customers, however, that he started to think that maybe he did have psychic powers. The self-deception didn’t last long.

In a 2007 interview with Michael Shermer (the Founding Publisher of Skeptic magazine) prof. Ray Hyman told his story: 

“Going back in time, I did palm readings for years, and for awhile I had become a gung ho believer. I started as a skeptic but as I added things to my repertoire I became a believer. I couldn’t travel as a young magician so I was forced to play at the same places and had to come up with new things for them. This is when I took up palm reading. I watched people in the carnies and got to know them and picked up a lot of things from them. I didn’t want to do sword swallowing or anything like that, but with palm reading you could tell people all sorts of detailed things about them, like what point they had a heart attack, what age they were when they had a problem with their head, and so on. By high school, even though I was a skeptic about most things, I believed in palm reading because it seemed plausible to me since the palm is physically connected with the body.”

 “…The late Stanley Jaks convinced me to do a palm reading on someone and tell them the exact opposite of what I would normally say. So I did this. If I thought I saw in this woman’s palm that she had heart trouble at age 5, for example. I said, “well, you have a very strong heart,” that sort of thing. In this particular case, though, it was really spooky, because she just sat there poker faced. Usually I get a lot of feedback from the subject. In fact, I depend on the feedback, and this woman was giving me nothing. It was weird. I thought I bombed. But it turns out the reason she was so quiet was because she was stunned. She told me it was the most impressive reading she had ever had. So I did this with a couple more clients, and I suddenly realized that whatever was going on had nothing to do with what I said but with the presentation itself. This was one of the reasons I went into psychology—I wanted to find out how it was that people, including myself, could be so easily deceived. In fact, this is one of the reasons why I am not as confrontational as James Randi, because I actually see that “there but for the grace of God go I.”

This is how Hyman discovered that it didn’t really matter what he told the people who’s hand he read. Because in his experience he found that his clients would figure out a way to make him right.

Hyman later became an expert in understanding ‘cold reading’ and ‘subjective validation’, the words that are used today to describe the process of making claims with no basis in fact or palm reading study and having them validated as true by others.

(Unfortunately… Hyman didn’t mentioned the titles of the palmistry books that he had used as a student)


You can read here a bit more about the ‘image’ of hand reading:

http://www.handresearch.com/hand/Evolutie/imagoEngels.htm

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 8, 2011 at 3:18 am

How to classify the palmar lines: the simian line, Sydney line & the Suwon crease!

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The study of the palmar lines [folding creases] traces back to the ancient civilisations of the Chinese and Indians as early as 3,000 years B.C. Historically the palmar lines have been adopted as the most important ‘tool’ of the classic Indian palmist with the purpose for ‘the guidance of humanity’. This explains why in all regions of the world the palmar lines became synonymous with the stigma of fortune telling (advocated by so-called ‘predictive palmistry’) – and subsequently debarring the hand lines from the scientific courts.

However, since the end of the 19th century the hand lines have been adopted by scientific researchers for other purposes, including: anthropological classification, personal identification (though the fingerprints are more well-known for this purpose), and hand lines also have a diagnostic purpose!

The combination of the heart line (distal transverse crease) & head line (proximal transverse crease) could be described as representing the most important aspect of the palm lines. The typical characteristics of these two so-called ‘transverse creases‘ (= heart line + head line) can be described as follows (see also the picture above):

• COMMON LINES: The heart line & the head line typically manifest as 2 unconnected lines, and only in human hands these lines typically do not cross the full palm (in the primate palm there are usually mulitiple horizontal lines which cross the full palm).

• SYDNEY LINE: The Sydney line can be recognized by the presence of an extended head line which crosses the full palm, combined with the presence of a normal heart line (both lines are required not to connect/fuse with eachother). NOTICE: From a scientific point, in medical science the Sydney line has been recognized in medical science as a ‘minor physical anomaly’ (MPA), and it became also known as a typical marker for e.g. the hand in Down syndrome, the hand in fragile-X syndrome, the hand in psoriasis & the hand in Schizophrenia. The name‘Sydney line’ was introduced in 1968 by Australian researcher S.G. Purvis-Smith who reported a high prevalance of Sydney lines in patients with congenital rubella. 

• EXTENDED HEART LINE: The extended heart line can be recognized by the presence of a very long heart line which crosses the full palm, combined with the presence of a normal head line (both lines are required not to connect/fuse with eachother). NOTICE: From a scientific point of view there is not much know about the extended heart line.

• SIMIAN CREASE: The simian crease can be recognized by the presence of a fusion between the head line and the heart line – resulting in the impression that one of both lines is missing. NOTICE: From a scientific point, in medical science the simian line has been recognized as a ‘minor physical anomaly’ (MPA), and it became also known as a typical marker for e.g. many syndromes (including Down syndrome) and many diseases such as the hand diabetes mellitusthe hand in rheumatoid arthritis. The name simian line was introduced in 1877 by French physician Paul Broca who described it as an unusual characteristic for the human hand.


• SUWON CREASE:
The Suwon crease can be recognized by the presence of two complete head lines (not a splitting head line, nor an interrupted head line), and the upper head line fuses/connects with the heart line. NOTICE: The history of the Suwon crease is still very young: it was first described in 2010 by Korean researchers, who found it only in 0.7% of a large Korean sample of 3.532 male hands (in the 1664 female hands it was never observed).


Read more about how hand lines relate to intelligence & personality related characteristics:

http://www.handresearch.com/diagnostics/hand-line-studies-formations-in-lines.htm

An advanced definition of various types of palmar creases.

 

The Korean researchers have presented in 2010 a new detailed method for classifying the various types of palmar lines, which includes some interesting elements which can be applied in Multi-Perspective Palm Reading:

 
“Definition of major and minor palm creases. Major palm creases are defined as follows. Radial longitudinal crease (I) becomes distinct according to the flexion of carpometacarpal joints of the thumb. Proximal (II) and distal transverse creases (III) become distinct according to the flexion of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the second to fifth fingers. Minor palm creases are defined as palm creases which are narrower than the two times of the epidermal groove width in palmprints (1), apart from major palm creases (2), crossing major palm creases (3), or leading to major palm creases by the sharpened end (4).”

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 25, 2011 at 10:30 pm

SIMIAN LINE – Can the lines in the palm or your hand predict your health or your future?

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The simian line became known as the most well known ‘uncommon’ palmar line variant, and when it is present in a hand it appears as if one of the normal lines is missing. The simian lines is the result of a fusion between the two major ‘palmar transverse creases’: in the fields of palmistry these are also known as the ‘head line’ (in medical science: distal transverse crease) and the ‘heart line’ (in medical science: proximal transverse crease).  About 3% of Western populations have a simian line in one of both hands, however in populations from Asia this percentage may be up to above 10%.

The word ‘simian line’ has a connotation with the hands of primates (simians), which are often featured with multiple likewise horizontal creases that cross the full palm.

And for this reason people often prefer to use other words to refer to the simian line. The most common simian line synonyms in daily language are: simian crease, simian fold, ape crease or the four finger line. In the scientific literature the simian line is usually named as: single palmar transverse crease or four finger line. 

MEDICAL DISORDERS:

The simian line is most well-known for it’s significance in Down’s syndrome (40%). However, the truth is that the medical disorders associated with simian line are not only seen in the most common chromosomal disorders including e.g.: fragile-X syndrome (18%), Klinefelter syndrome (12%), Turner syndrome (27%) & Marfan syndrome). But the simian line is also more often seen in the most common medical disorders, such as: diabetes mellitus (10%), psoriasis (12%) & rheumatoid arthritis (18%).


HAND LINES
 & DERMATOGLYPHICS:

Understanding the nature of palmar creases requires a consideration of the palmar dermatoglyphics as well, which concern the fine ridges & grooves in the skin that can be seen in the  palm or your hand with the bare eye (assuming that you have normal eyesight). Because both the palmar creases & the dermatoglyphics largely develop in the 2nd and 3th month of pregnancy under the influences of growth stress forces in the volar skin.

Dermatoglyphics: AtD-angles in trisomy syndromes (trisomy 21 = Down syndrome).

Few people are aware… that the ‘troublesome’ character of the simian line depends significantly on the dermatoglyphics in the so-called mount of Moon (in medical science: hypothenar). For, the high prevalence of the simian line in diseases & syndromes is typically featured with multiple deltas (triradii) and often a high positioned axial triradius, which results in a high AtD-angle. See the figure on the right: all listed trisomy syndromes are also known for a very high prevalance of the simian crease. Therefor, in order to understand the nature of a simian line in the hand(s) of an individual – an analysis of other hand features is a first requirement: the simian line on it’s own means … nothing!

BEHAVIOR, CHARACTER & TEMPERAMENT:

Scientific research R.S. Bali has presented in his book ‘Anthropology of Crease Morphogenesis‘ a summary of studies which have presented significant results for the simian line in the perspective of criminal behavior, character & temperament. But even quite a few celebrities have a simian line!

The Simian Line (2000)

‘THE SIMIAN LINE’ – THE MOVIE:

Can the lines in the palm or your hand predict your health or your future? The impact of the simian line is not only significant in the fields of palm reading & scientific research. For sure, the simian line has for touched the lives of  many individuals, and this has even resulted in a movie titled: ‘ The Simian Line‘ (2000). A short synopsis:

“An eccentric palm reader predicts that one of the couples attending an intimate dinner party will end their relationship before the year is over, sparking confusion and doubt amongst the guests, in the tender romantic comedy SIMIAN LINE. The star studded cast includes Harry Connick Jr., Cindy Crawford, Tyne Daly, William Hurt, Monica Keena, Dylan Bruno, Samantha Mathis, Lynn Redgrave, Jamey Sheridan and Eric Stoltz.”

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 23, 2011 at 7:50 pm

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