Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Posts Tagged ‘sexe

Fingerprints reveal Clues about Congenital Heart Defects!

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 In an earlier post a report was made that fingerprints reveal clues about many things – including: sexe, race, diet, lifestyle and disease. Fingerprint ridge width & the so-called ‘minituae’ provide info about sexe.

In this new report we’ll focuss on a few details in the fingerprint of the pinky finger.

 


Pinky fingers are usually featured with an ulnar loop:

The World Map of Fingerprints has shown that in all nations around the world the pinky fingerprint is dominated by the presence of an ‘ulnar loop’.

And in a study among 5 world populations (N=2.785) in 78% of the individuals the pinky finger is featured with an ‘ulnar loop’. The study also revealed that the effect size for fingerprints & sexe and fingerprints & ethnic difference is the largest in the pinky finger.

Other studies (Loesch, 1983) have revealed that when a pinky finger is featured with a whorl or arch, the ring finger is usually featured with the same fingerprint pattern type. In other words: the fingerprint type on the pinky finger typically highly depends on the fingerprints of the other fingers – especially the ring finger.

This implicates that the fingerprint type displayed by the little finger hardly provides any clues – because usually it’s an ‘ulnar loop’ and otherwise it correlates with the fingerprint on the ring finger.


Ridge count in pinky fingers:

However, beyond the fingerprint pattern type, another aspect of the fingerprint may reveal more specified meaningful information.

The earlier report explained how fingerprint ridge density & minituae (dermatoglyphics) correlate with sexe – especially when applied to the pinky finger.

 But there is another revealing aspects: the so-called ‘ridge count’.

For example: in 1989 a study revealed that the ridge count in the left pinky finger can become highly meaningful when it is summarized with the ridge count of the five finger of the right hand minus the ridge count of the five fingers of the left hand. In a population of people with congenital heart defects in Down syndrome, the summation outcome was typically (in 10 out of 13 individuals) lower than the ridge count of the left pinky finger itself. While among the control population (people who have Down syndrome without congenital heart defects) the same result was relatively rare (in only 1 out of 38 individuals).

One can understand this rather remarkable example of palm reading in the perspective of the fact that usually in the fingers of the right hand the ridge count is typically higher than in the fingers of the left hand (this effect is often largest in the thumb).


 Read more about how these results & dermatoglyphics can be understand in the perspective of hand developments & life in the uterus:

http://www.handresearch.com/news/fingerprint-characteristic-early-prenatal-environment.htm

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Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 3, 2011 at 4:19 am

What can a single Fingerprint really reveal?

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Fingerprints mark us out as individuals and leave telltale signs of our presence on every object that we touch. However, what else can a fingerprints reveal? Authors of many palm reading books suggest that a single fingerprint represents certain ‘fixed’ qualities. However, there has never been presented any evidence which support such specific claim. And despite the fact that certain fingerprint characteristics correlate highly for sexe an individual, even the sexe can not always be determined from a single fingerprint!

What can a single fingerprint reveal? As a matter of fact, there are many myths about fingerprints. For quite a while scientists assumed that the purpose of fingerprints should be associated with giving ‘grip’ to the hand. But even this ‘grip’ theory became doubtful according a 2009 study.


CAN A SINGLE FINGERPRINT REVEAL IF IT BELONGS TO A MALE OR FEMALE?

The current state of knowledge is that only the distal region of a fingerprint correlates with sexe. Studies have revealed that fingerprint ridge densities of 12 or less (per 25 mm) is usually a male, while fingerprint ridge densities of 15 or more (per 25 mm) is usually a female. But fingerprint ridge density alone can not reliably predict the sexe in large samples (below 75%).

However, there is a long list of tiny fingerprint characteristics that are also significant for sexe; and combining ridge density with those characteristics will usually result in a correct identification of sexe – especially when applied to the pinky finger.


A summary of major
& minutiae ridge characteristics that vary among males & females:

1 – Finger size: larger in males;
2 – Ridge dots: more common in males (34%) than in females (20%);
3 – Short ridges: more common in males (38%) than in females (23%);
4 – Ridge spurs: more common in males (32%) than in females (26%);
5 – No ridge endings: more common in females (8% ) than in males (2%);
6 – Ridge lakes: more common in females (45%) than in males (35%);
7 Ridge thickness to valley thickness ratio (RTVTR): lower in females;
8 – Ridge count: lower in females.


READ MORE ABOUT FINGERPRINTS:

Fingerprint distributions & hand diagnostics
Fascinating articles & reports about fingerprints

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 22, 2011 at 1:44 am

Fingerprints reveal Clues about Sexe, Race, Diet, Lifestyle & Disease!

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Papillary ridges in a fingerprint.

The papillary ridges in every fingerprint are unique to each individual, and these characteristics do not change over time (after fixation during the 2nd and 3th prenatal month). Therefore fingerprints became recognized as a usefull tool for identification. However, the certain details in a fingerprint + the distribution of the pattern types among the 10 fingers can reveal much more!

In general, one could say that beyond identity fingerprints can reveal clues that relate to: sexe, race,  diet, lifestyle, and disease. Below follows an introduction to how fingerprints are related to these themes.


FINGERPRINTS & SEXE:

Biometric studies have shown that fingerprint type distributions & palmar dermatoglyphics vary significantly among both sexes: females have more arches, and males have more whorls. However, another stricking sexe-difference is that females usually have more ridges per cm2.


FINGERPRINTS & RACE:

Anthropologic studies have revealed that fingerprint type distributions vary significantly among the populations around the world. More details have been reported in the posts about the Fingerprint World Map & the World Populations.


 FINGERPRINTS & DIET:

A few years ago reports have been made that using commercial gelatine based tape (which was already used by police) and high-tech chemical analysis under spectroscopic microscope – provides a detailed picture of the chemical- & metabolic make-up found on a fingerprint. The study revealed that specific amino acids indicated whether the “suspect” was a vegetarian or meat-eater, and different fatty acid profiles suggested provided clues to their racial origins. 


FINGERPRINTS & LIFESTYLE:

The same microscope method (based on the study of chemicals & metabolics featured with a fingerprint) can also unveal e.g. the use of substances, including: cigarettes, drugs & grooming products. And even age can be determined roughly with this method!


FINGERPRINTS & DISEASE:

Scientists have stated that the scientific study of dermatoglyphics in an individual (via: the palmar dermatoglyphics & the fingerprints) can tell doctors about the risk for certain diseases. Multi-Perspective Palm Reading describes the link between fingerprints & diseases by detail!

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 20, 2011 at 2:39 am

World Population Study shows: Fingerprint in Pointer Finger is most unique!

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Every person has unique fingerprint. In the forensic sciences the process of comparing two fingerprints – known as ‘dactyloscopy‘ – is focussed on identifying tiny characteristics in the friction ridge skin. However, fingerprint pattern types are not unique at all: they e.g. fingerprint pattern types highly depend on sexe & race. An international study points out that the fingerprint type in the pointer finger is most unique!

In order to study the interactive effects of sexe & race in fingerprints (dermatoglyphics), a study has been conducted on fingerprint samples in 5 world populations (2.785 people) – including: Americans (A), British (B), Chinese (C), Iranians (I), and Nigerians (N). 

Only the so-called Vucetich fingerprint types were considered in this study, which is founded on the number of triradii + their location:

– whorls are characterised by the presence of 2 triradii;
– ulnar loops are characterised by the presence of 1 triradius positioned at the thumb-side;
– radial loops are characterised by the presence of 1 triradius positioned at the pinky-side;
– arches are characterised by the absense of a triradius.

The results of the study are shown in the picture below:


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FINGERPRINTS & SEXE:

International studies in the past have shown that fingerprint types in females almost universally differ from males in having more arches. And usually females also differ in bearing fewer whorls, and typically they also tend to have slightly less radial loops.

The new study shows that in all 5 populations arches are much more common in females: +44.9% (compared to males); and whorls are indeed less common in females: – 10.5% (compared to males). And as expected the sexe-effects in radial loops (-0.6%) and ulnar loops is much smaller (+2.3%).

Interestingly, the most typical sexe-effect for arches is by far less prominent in the index finger: +11.5% (compared to the other fingers: thumb: +57.6%, middle finger: +69.4%, ring finger: +58.4%, pinky finger: +123.1%). This indicates that the fingerprint type in the index finger is least ruled by sexe.


FINGERPRINTS & RACE:

The Fingerprints World Map has shown that studies in the past have shown that the occurence of fingerprint types varies significantly in the populations around the world: e.g. Asians are known for a higher occurence of whorls, and Africans for a higher occurence of arches.

The new study confirms these earlier findings:

– Whorls are by far most common in Chinese males (48.2%) and females (45.4%);
– Arches are by far most common in Nigerian females (13.7%) and males (9.1%).

Interestingly again, the details show that the most typical racial-effects are least prominent in the index finger – in the picture this is e.g. also indicated by the relatively small variance for the ulnar loops among the races!


POINTER FINGER  HAS THE HIGHEST VARIABILITY:

Summarizing, the study has shown that sexe & race have relatively small effects on the fingerprint type of the pointer finger.

And this might actually makes sense, because the pointer finger [index finger] is known for displaying the highest level of variability – e.g. arches & radial loops are known for manifesting by far most often on the index finger (and the same is true for less common fingerprint types such as: the tented arches & accidentals).

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 16, 2011 at 4:20 pm

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