Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Archive for the ‘hand motorics’ Category

Primatology palm reading!

leave a comment »

Primatology palm reading demonstrates how hand structure + function relate to capabilities & behavior. The ‘Primate Hands Family Tree’ (see picture above) describes the typical hand characteristics seen in the major primate subfamilies and the individual species.

For example, the so-called ‘prosimians’ (lower primates) have a completely different hand structure than seen in the so-called ‘simians’ (higher primates – including human kind).  Because in ‘prosimians’ the 4th digit is typically the longest of all 5 digits, while in ‘simians’ the 3rd digit is typically the longest.

But there is so much more to tell about the hand structure in primates. For example, there is a clear pattern in the male-female hand difference (males tend to have relatively longer fingers + wider palms than females), and the typical hand features seen in gorillas & baboons – who are both known as the most violent primate species!

And interestingly… the Primate Hands Family Tree also gives us a better understanding of the nature of the 2D:4D digit ratio (far most primates species have a much lower ratio than seen in human kind) and the fascinating dermatoglyphic ‘whorl’ patterns (in nearly all primate species ‘whorls’  are more common than in us humans).

The article ‘Primate Palm Reading‘ includes a summary of many interesting facts about the evolutionary basis of modern palm reading – including 20+ fascinating illustrations!

FULL ARTICLE:

http://www.handresearch.com/news/primatology-palm-reading-primate-hands-family-tree.htm

 

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

March 27, 2013 at 1:22 am

Hand Assessment Chart: A palm reading profile via 36 hand features!

leave a comment »


Aristole described: ‘the hand is the organ of the organs’. Later, in medical science the hand became recognized to represent the most differentiated external part of the body. This implicates that an assessment of the hand is a rather complex (arbitrary) task. In order to simplify the task an ‘assessment chart’ was developed based on the principles described by Multi-Perspective Palm Reading.

The ‘assessment chart’ (see above) presents an overview of 36 key-features of the hand, the significance of all individual hand markers involved has been confirmed in scientific studies – though the significance of course varies and depends on the theme for which a hand feature is used to make a (hand) assessment.

The chart is divided in 8 sections, one for each of the 7 hand dimensions (including: dermatoglyphics, finger length, lines, motorics, nails, shape & skin) – NOTICE: the dimension ‘dermatoglyphics’ is divided in a sub-section describing the fingerprints + a sub-section describing palmar dermatoglyphics.

Learn more about the background, purpose & principles of Multi-Perspective Palm Reading!

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

February 9, 2013 at 1:02 am

A Hand-Test for recognizing Marfan syndrome!

with 143 comments

 
In may 2011 a detailed report was presented at this blog about how a ‘multi-perspective’ approach to the hand can be used to find the most essential hand characteristics in Marfan syndrome. Dozens of comments, questions and suggestions were made in response.

Time for a more detailed report:

The brand new ‘Marfan Syndrome Hand Test’ (see above) provides you a unique opportunity to make a first check-up for Marfan syndrome via your own hands!

The most discriminating hand featured typical for Marfan syndrome are included in this test – including: various aspects of arachnodactyly (spider fingers), which manifest via the hand shape; various guidelines for recognizing skin hyperelasticity, which relates to the hand skin quality; and a short list of hand signs for hypermobility, which relates to the hand motorics.

More details about the hand in Marfan syndrome and the background of this test are presented at HandResearch.com:
http://www.handresearch.com/diagnostics/marfan-syndrome-hand-test.htm 

(Your thoughts & observations are welcome!) 

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 7, 2012 at 6:04 pm

%d bloggers like this: