Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Posts Tagged ‘hand signs

The TOP 10 Hand Signs in Diabetes Mellitus – type 1!

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Sclerodactly: thickening of the dorsal skin a very significant hand sign for the hand in Diabetes Mellitus – type 1.

 

– THE TOP 10 HAND SIGNS FOR RECOGNIZING DIABETES MELLITUS – TYPE 1 –

This TOP 10 is composed from a list of 34 hand signs for Diabetes Mellitus; the hand signs are ranked by Log Odds Ratio – which are calculated from the prevalence (%) among Diabetics & controls.

1 – Sclerodactyly: thick, waxy/hardening skin on back of the hand [Log Odds Ratio = +4.58]
2 – Fingerprints: radial loop on pinky [Log Odds Ratio = +3.16]
3 – Fingerprints: radial loop on ringfinger [Log Odds Ratio = +3.09]
4 – Neuropathy: loss of function: movement / sensation (Tinel’s sign, Phalen’s test, preacher sign / prayer sign, limited joint mobility) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.98]
5 – Pink patches on back of the hand / fingers (granuloma annulare lesions) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.73]
6 – Shiny patches, first: red-brown & painless, later: yellow & ulceration (necrobiosis lipoidica) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.71]
7 – Little skin pebbles on back of the hand / fingers (Huntley’s papules) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.64]
8 – Locked finger, a.k.a. ‘trigger finger’ (stenosing tenosynovitis) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.50]
9 – Palm ridges: high density on hypothenar [Log Odds Ratio = +2.50]
10 – Palm: radial arch on hypothenar [Log Odds Ratio = + 2.47]

‘Scerodactly’ (= localized thickening of the skin on the fingers: see the photo above & below) is listed as the most significant hand sign in diabetes mellitus type 1 (= insuline dependent diabetes) – according the log odds ratio statistics. And it is interesting to notice here that 4 of the 10 hand signs relate to the skin of the hand (see hand signs 1, 5, 6 and 7), including one that relates to the nails (hand sign 4).

NOTICE: In the field of medical dermatology the nails are perceived as being a part of the skin!

Additionally, studies have shown that skin abnormalties in diabetes become very signficant when these are also featured by motoric problems.

And it is fascinating to notice that these TOP 10 hand signs significant for Diabetes Mellitus – type 1 is a mix of hand features that relate to both the palm (5 hand signs) and fingers (7 hand signs) – hand sign five and seven relates to both the palm and the fingers.

And these 10 hand signs also relate to five of the seven perspectives described by Multi-Perspective Palm Reading, including: the skin quality of the hand (4 hand signs), fingerprints & palmar dermatoglyphics (4 hand signs), hand motorics (2 hand signs).

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Written by martijnvanmensvoort

August 23, 2011 at 6:36 pm

TOP 10 Hand Signs indicative for Schizophrenia!

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A phantom picture for the hand in schizophrenia.

 

– THE TOP 10 HAND SIGNS FOR RECOGNIZING SCHIZOPHRENIA –

This TOP 10 is composed from a list of 37 hand signs for Schizophrenia, and the hand signs are ranked by Log Odds Ratio – which are calculated from the prevalence (%) among Schizophrenics & controls.

1 – Excessive accessory creases [Log Odds Ratio = +3.40]
2 – Pinky: imobility (ankylosis)  [Log Odds Ratio = +3.02]
3 – Lack of expression / rigid expression [Log Odds Ratio = +2.77]
4 – Nail fold plexus visibility [Log Odds Ratio = +2.74]
5 – Sydney line [Log Odds Ratio = +2.45]
6 – Nails: small & underdeveloped (rudimentary) [Log Odds Ratio = +2.43]
7 – Chaotic arrangement of secundary creases [Log Odds Ratio = +2.32]
8 – Simian crease [Log Odds Ratio = +2.27]
9 – Atypical handedness [Log Odds Ratio = +1.80]
10 – Nails: excessively curved outwards (hyperconcex nails) [Log Odds Ratio = +1.74]


It is interesting to notice here that 4 of the 10 hand signs relate to the fingertips (see hand signs 1, 4, 6 and 10). And additionally 4 of the 10 hand signs relate to the hand lines.

And it is fascinating to notice that these TOP 10 hand signs significant for Schizophrenia is a mix of hand features that relate to both the palm (5 hand signs) and fingers (6 hand signs) – hand sign one relates to both the palm and the fingers.

And these 10 hand signs also relate to five of the seven perspectives described by Multi-Perspective Palm Reading, including: the primary, secundary- & accessory lines (4 hand signs), fingernails & nailfold (3 hand sign), hand motorics (2 hand sign), and morphology (1 hand sign).

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 29, 2011 at 11:10 pm

Hands signs in Marfan syndrome: thin fingers, long hand shape & hypermobility!

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Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder characterised by a tall, slender body featured with long limbs & long thin fingers. The most serious complications are the defects of the heart valves and the aorta, which could lead to an aortic rupture (due to too much stress on the aorta), which is usually fatal. However, many people who have this disorder are not aware of it – partly because Marfan syndrome typically becomes manifest only after the age of 5. But there are hand signs that have a highly reliable diagnostic value!

Marfan syndrome is featured with many typical hand characteristics, however a combination of two specific hands signs related to a long hand shape (hand signs) & hand motorics (joint hypermobility) is often enough to identify the disorder.

THE STEINBERG SIGN (a):

This test is used for the clinical evaluation of Marfan patients.

Procedure:
Instruct the patient to fold his thumb into the closed fist. This test is positive if the thumb tip extends from palm of hand (see figure a).

THE WALKER-MURDOCH SIGN (b):

This test is used for the evaluation of patients with Marfan syndrome.

Procedure:
Instruct the patient to grip his wrist with his opposite hand. If thumb and fifth finger of the hand overlap with each other, this represents a positive Walker-Murdoch sign (see figure b).

 JOINT HYPERMOBILITY

How to check if a person has hypermobility? You can check this easily by doing the 5 tests that are included in the so-called ‘Beighton score‘:  see figure 1.

A ‘Beighton score’ of 4 or above usually indicates hypermobility.

And if a person has the Sternberg sign + Walker-Murdoch sign + hypermobility, the chances are close to 90% that the person has Marfan syndrome.

The presence of other related hand markers such as: skin quality (hyperextensiblity), a simian crease, extra digital transverse creases, or a high positioned axial triradius provide other hand signs which are indicative for a person to have a medical diagnosis for Marfan syndrome.

Marfan hands.

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

May 20, 2011 at 3:39 pm

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