Palm Reading Perspectives

Multi-Perspective Palm Reading: About Hands & how to make a Hand-Diagnosis

Posts Tagged ‘pinky finger

The Pinky Finger: A Measure for Sexe, Personality & Psychopathology!

with 2 comments


 

You probably heard about the ‘2D:4D finger ratio’ (digit ratio), which has widely been recognized as a measure for prenatal hormonal life.  Over the past years quite a few studies have revealed that this ratio between the pointer finger (2D) and the ring finger (4D) represents e.g. a correlation with various aspects of human behavior. But how about the other fingers and their ratios? An introduction about the key-role of the pinky finger (5th finger).

So far, out of the hundreds of finger-length-studies published so far, only a couple of those have been focussed on other fingers as well.

 Interestingly, the pinky finger has turned out often to play a key-role in the most significant results. A quick overview of some issues to remember:

De Bruin et al. (2011) found that a high 3D:5D ratio (= relatively short pinky finger) may reveal a clue that correlates with psychopathology. The 3D:5D ratio in boys and in girls was positively associated with scores on Externalizing Problems. Further, in girls only, the 3D:5D ratio was positively correlated to scores on Internalizing Problems.

McFadden & Bracht (2009) found that the largest effect sizes related to sexe differences (males versus females) were demonstrated in ratios that involved the pinky finger.

Gosh (2005) found that pinky finger ratio may reveal a personality clue related to the dimensions Neuroticism & Psychoticism: a tip ending below the interphalangeal crease of the ring finger (4th finger) correlates in men & women with high scores on Neuroticism & Psychoticism.

Wolff (1951) found that both an extraordinary short pinky finger and an extraordinary long pinky finger is often seen in schizophrenia. 

Additionally, one should also be aware that beyond the length of the pinky finger, quite a few other dimensions of the 5th finger (incl. clinodactyly) have been associated with various types of  medical- and neurological disorders – such as: autism. Which makes the pinky finger an important aspect to be considered in the perspective of Multi-Perspective Palm Reading.

Many more details are presented in the article:
Do not underestimate your little finger!

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

September 6, 2011 at 2:30 pm

TOP 10 Hand Signs indicative for Down syndrome!

with 2 comments

A pair of hands of a person who has Down syndrome.

 

– THE TOP 10 HAND SIGNS FOR RECOGNIZING DOWN SYNDROME –

This TOP 10 is composed from a list of 27 hand signs for Down syndrome, and the hand signs are ranked by Log Odds Ratio – which are  calculated from the prevalence (%) among Down syndrome patients & controls.

1 – Single crease on pinky finger [Log Odds Ratio = +4.87]
2 – Ridge line A ends above heart line [Log Odds Ratio = +4.07]
3 – AtD angle is 57 degrees or higher [Log Odds Ratio = +3.96]
4 – Hyperflexible finger joints [Log Odds Ratio = +3.58]
5 – Multiple palmar zones: ridge dissociation [Log Odds Ratio = +3.18]
6 – Large ulnar loops on hypothenar [Log Odds Ratio = +3.02]
7 – Simian crease [Log Odds Ratio = +2.69]
9 – Brachydactly [Log Odds Ratio = +2.50]
8 – Fingerprint: radial loop on ring finger [Log Odds Ratio = +2.46]
10 – Three or more triradii on the hypothenar [Log Odds Ratio = +2.32]

It is interesting to notice here that 4 of the 10 hand signs relate to the palmar hypothenar (‘mount of Moon’ in the fields of palmistry), and additionally the majority of these hand signs relate to the ulnar side of the hand (hypothenar + the pinky and ring finger).

And it is fascinating to notice that these TOP 10 hand signs significant for Down syndrome is a mix of hand features that relate to both the palm (6 hand signs) and fingers (4 hand signs).

And these 10 hand signs also relate to five of the seven perspectives described by Multi-Perspective Palm Reading, including: the dermatoglyphics (5 hand signs), palmar lines & interphalangeal creases (2 hand signs), finger morphology (1 hand sign), motorics (1 hand sign), and skin quality (1 hand sign).

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 18, 2011 at 2:13 am

Fingerprints reveal Clues about Congenital Heart Defects!

with one comment

 In an earlier post a report was made that fingerprints reveal clues about many things – including: sexe, race, diet, lifestyle and disease. Fingerprint ridge width & the so-called ‘minituae’ provide info about sexe.

In this new report we’ll focuss on a few details in the fingerprint of the pinky finger.

 


Pinky fingers are usually featured with an ulnar loop:

The World Map of Fingerprints has shown that in all nations around the world the pinky fingerprint is dominated by the presence of an ‘ulnar loop’.

And in a study among 5 world populations (N=2.785) in 78% of the individuals the pinky finger is featured with an ‘ulnar loop’. The study also revealed that the effect size for fingerprints & sexe and fingerprints & ethnic difference is the largest in the pinky finger.

Other studies (Loesch, 1983) have revealed that when a pinky finger is featured with a whorl or arch, the ring finger is usually featured with the same fingerprint pattern type. In other words: the fingerprint type on the pinky finger typically highly depends on the fingerprints of the other fingers – especially the ring finger.

This implicates that the fingerprint type displayed by the little finger hardly provides any clues – because usually it’s an ‘ulnar loop’ and otherwise it correlates with the fingerprint on the ring finger.


Ridge count in pinky fingers:

However, beyond the fingerprint pattern type, another aspect of the fingerprint may reveal more specified meaningful information.

The earlier report explained how fingerprint ridge density & minituae (dermatoglyphics) correlate with sexe – especially when applied to the pinky finger.

 But there is another revealing aspects: the so-called ‘ridge count’.

For example: in 1989 a study revealed that the ridge count in the left pinky finger can become highly meaningful when it is summarized with the ridge count of the five finger of the right hand minus the ridge count of the five fingers of the left hand. In a population of people with congenital heart defects in Down syndrome, the summation outcome was typically (in 10 out of 13 individuals) lower than the ridge count of the left pinky finger itself. While among the control population (people who have Down syndrome without congenital heart defects) the same result was relatively rare (in only 1 out of 38 individuals).

One can understand this rather remarkable example of palm reading in the perspective of the fact that usually in the fingers of the right hand the ridge count is typically higher than in the fingers of the left hand (this effect is often largest in the thumb).


 Read more about how these results & dermatoglyphics can be understand in the perspective of hand developments & life in the uterus:

http://www.handresearch.com/news/fingerprint-characteristic-early-prenatal-environment.htm

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

July 3, 2011 at 4:19 am

What can a single Fingerprint really reveal?

leave a comment »

Fingerprints mark us out as individuals and leave telltale signs of our presence on every object that we touch. However, what else can a fingerprints reveal? Authors of many palm reading books suggest that a single fingerprint represents certain ‘fixed’ qualities. However, there has never been presented any evidence which support such specific claim. And despite the fact that certain fingerprint characteristics correlate highly for sexe an individual, even the sexe can not always be determined from a single fingerprint!

What can a single fingerprint reveal? As a matter of fact, there are many myths about fingerprints. For quite a while scientists assumed that the purpose of fingerprints should be associated with giving ‘grip’ to the hand. But even this ‘grip’ theory became doubtful according a 2009 study.


CAN A SINGLE FINGERPRINT REVEAL IF IT BELONGS TO A MALE OR FEMALE?

The current state of knowledge is that only the distal region of a fingerprint correlates with sexe. Studies have revealed that fingerprint ridge densities of 12 or less (per 25 mm) is usually a male, while fingerprint ridge densities of 15 or more (per 25 mm) is usually a female. But fingerprint ridge density alone can not reliably predict the sexe in large samples (below 75%).

However, there is a long list of tiny fingerprint characteristics that are also significant for sexe; and combining ridge density with those characteristics will usually result in a correct identification of sexe – especially when applied to the pinky finger.


A summary of major
& minutiae ridge characteristics that vary among males & females:

1 – Finger size: larger in males;
2 – Ridge dots: more common in males (34%) than in females (20%);
3 – Short ridges: more common in males (38%) than in females (23%);
4 – Ridge spurs: more common in males (32%) than in females (26%);
5 – No ridge endings: more common in females (8% ) than in males (2%);
6 – Ridge lakes: more common in females (45%) than in males (35%);
7 Ridge thickness to valley thickness ratio (RTVTR): lower in females;
8 – Ridge count: lower in females.


READ MORE ABOUT FINGERPRINTS:

Fingerprint distributions & hand diagnostics
Fascinating articles & reports about fingerprints

Written by martijnvanmensvoort

June 22, 2011 at 1:44 am

%d bloggers like this: